Aug 192012
 




 

OK – I have done several projects on the route, including Illinois, New Mexico, and California. I live and work and enjoy Arizona, so I think it is time I ‘keep it close to home’ for my next project.

I actually have (4) in AZ I have my hands in:
The first is an old Richfield Gas Station in Winslow.
The second is the famous Meteor City Trading Post.
The third is a historic sign for a restaurant / motel located on Route 66, in Arizona.
The fourth is, well, a gas station in Tucumcari NM - so I guess that one really wouldn’t count!!

Richfield Gas Station – Winslow AZ

This is an interesting project for me. For the past year, I actually tried to BUY this gas station for my own and restore it back to it’s former glory, and then (one day) maybe lease it out as a gift shop or a little sandwich place for tourists. This would have been one of the ONLY restored Richfield Gas Stations on the route, and it would have been a gem! While going back and forth with it’s current owner (mind you, for almost a year!) I was doing massive research on all things Richfield. This included researching what the building looked like when it first opened, finding old photos, and figuring out what brands this station would have carried (this way I could have figured out which signs to put on the exterior of the building). So it was getting down to the wire and the owner decided to keep it! I was blown away! I felt if I lost one of my children at the mall for a minute as I tried to get everything ready to be a ‘proud owner of American history’ – but alas, it was not meant to be.
I sucked it up and through a few emails we continued to talk and one day, he told me his plans with the building, to ‘bring it back to the way it looked like in the 30′s and possibly run a business out of it’… Now mind you, I NEVER told him my plans – as far as he was concerned – I was just ‘some guy’ who wanted to buy the old building – nothing more. It felt like a weight was lifted off my chest as I knew someone had the same plans I did for the building. With that, I met up with him and downloaded ALL my research to his hard drive as a ‘helping hand’ on how to guide him to preserving this gas station.
Now, I am willing to offer to help him - as long as he will let me…


Meteor City Trading Post – Meteor City AZ

This one came to me via a converstation with Roger Naylor - co-author of ‘Arizona Kicks on Route 66′ - while on a phone call one day.
We were talking about preservation work and how he thought it would be ‘great’ to partake in a project -  as he did not know or want to ‘spearhead’ one, but he was more than willing to lend a helping hand.
We were talking about different sites on Route 66 in Arizona and he mentioned he spoke to the owners of the trading post and they were wanting to repaint their ‘World’s Longest Route 66 Map’ as the elements have taken a toll on it. I told him I would stop in on my (many) trips back and forth to Holbrook and see what they are looking to do. Well, I did as promised and found the owner of the trading post, and she pretty much did not want to believe some ‘stranger’ stops in offering a ‘friendly helping hand’ and help them fix something which tens of thousands of travelers stop and look at. As we went outside to tour the map, she was pointing out the damage done by the winds (note: the wind gusts get up to 40-60MPH in the open desert, and when you have something that big sitting there unprotected, it takes a beating). We talked about it being painted some time ago with the direction of Hampton Inns – but she said it was time for to repair the wood and repaint the map. As we walked around the property, she mentioned to me they still had the ORIGINAL trading post building, built in 1932(ish) and it was covered up by fencing. She then mentioned ‘everyone knows it is here and wants to see it and take pictures, but we do not know how to open it up to the public.’ So the lightbuld goes off. I told her to close up the front window and make sure the front door is secure and then remove and realign the wood fencing to INCLUDE the front of the historic original trading post. She loved the idea! Then out of the corner of my eye, I see two painting on the fence and ask her about them. She said ‘oh, Bob Waldmire painted those…’ Naturally, I replied “who knows that?!? Why isn’t there a sign or plaque letting the travelers know this?!?”
So there seems to be THREE projects at this site, all which are just as valuable as the next.


Historic Motel/Restaurant sign – somewhere on Route 66 in AZ

This one we all know and love BUT I need to check with the current owner to see what his/her plans are. He/she might already be working on something as I have seen work done on a portion of it, but the entire sign needs to be redone to show off its grandeur!
This one I will have to get back to you on, but I would LOVE to have the opportunity to work on this one!


Gas Station #10 - Tucumcari NM
OK, this one isn’t in Arizona and this one is pretty much planned with or without me there, but I figured if the timing was right, it is the least I can do to not only help out Tucumcari (again) but to help Mr. Rich Talley for his (several) trips to Needles to criticize me (I mean) help me with not only the 66 Motel sign restoration, but being there with the TEXACO and UNION gas stations before we went to Victorville for the fest.

I believe this should be enough to last me the rest of the year! Although in high country (northern Arizona) it does snow and get really cold, and all of these seem to be on the same ‘belt line’ - I might have to pick only two or three at the most – leaving one or so until next year…

Let me know what you think…

Jul 292012
 


We have stopped by the older, smaller park in the past – so it will be very interesting to see what the final finished product of the new one….

The City of Winslow has begun the first phase of a 9/11 Remembrance Garden that will honor the victims and families of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The idea, spearheaded by the Winslow Rotary Club, grew from a memorial that has been in place for the past 10 years in the community and a desire to recognize that tragic day that changed the lives of all Americans.

The monument was originally situated at the corner of Transcon Lane and Route 66, and consists of an American flag along with two girders from the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center that were shipped to the city in the year following 9/11. The girders are said to be the tallest remnants shipped to any town at 14’ and 15’ high, with an inscription at the base letting visitors know that terrorism will not be tolerated, and that the tragedy that took the lives of so many and brought forth great heroism will never be forgotten.

A road improvement project was planned that required the monument to be moved and it was recently relo-cated west on Route 66 to a grassy rest area where the Rotary Club hopes to create a garden that will be a truly significant memorial to the 9/11 tragedy; one that travelers can visit and pay homage to those who fought and continue to fight the War on Terror.

City Planner Paul Ferris and RSP Architects of Tempe set to work designing a plan based on the ideas of city council members, community members and others who wanted to contribute. Donations are being sought and a $1.5 million grant application was submitted to the Scenic Byways Program in January to fund the project, but no notification of an award has been received as of yet.

In an interview with Ferris, he explained the significance of the design created for the garden. The original monument will be centered on what Ferris called “Ground Zero,” surrounded by five walls representing the walls of the Pentagon. Inscribed on the inside of four of the walls will be the names of the victims and a story of the events that occurred that day.

Surrounding the exterior of the walls will be four consecutive rings of metal representing the four aircraft that were involved in the incident. From an aerial view, the sidewalks projecting from the center of the monu-ment represent the wings of an aircraft.

A short distance from that memorial will be a circular area representative of an kiva similar to those of a-cient Puebloan tribes for spiritual ceremonies. At the center will be two stainless steel sculptures up to 10-feet in height connecting earth and sky, and symbolizing contrails to the North Star, creating a large sundial. According to Ferris, the monument will be to honor those who sacrificed their lives in the pursuit of liberty on Flight 93, the plane passengers attempted to regain control of after it was taken over by terrorists.

As part of that monument, an American flag will be posted at the top of a shallow ramp, and surrounding that monument will be boot and shoe imprints in the cement, an idea of City Attorney Dale Patton and something Ferris refers to as a commonality between that event and those that continue on today: “Following the attacks there was a gray dust that settled over Ground Zero and South Manhattan. In a similar way the wars on terrorism fought in Iraq, Afghanistan and in the fight against Al Qaeda all occurred in areas of sand and dust. The shoe and boot imprints represent the common and symbolic union of those events.”

Whether the grant funds for the project will come to fruition is uncertain, but Ferris is confident of the pur-pose behind the garden and that funds raised through donations will continue the project, although perhaps not as quickly as hoped.

According to Ferris, “The garden symbolizes all the events that took place on 9/11, and the sacrifice and the pursuit of liberty for our country. It recognizes that although this took place in New York City, it happened to every one of us and we can never forget.”

By Linda Kor – AZ Journal

 

Mar 222012
 



Seeing I have the next 12-14 months running back and forth from Scottsdale to Joseph City / Holbrook, I figured I should REALLY get to know the eastern part of Route 66 in Arizona as well as I could…

I usually leave around 5am (or earlier) on my trek north to Flagstaff then east to Joseph City. I like driving in the dark, there is no one out and the road is pretty much yours.

Getting to Flagstaff – the snow was everywhere! Reports said 19-28″ (depending on who you believe) fell over the weekend, and I decided to postpone my trip one day to get the plows out and do what they do best.






I hit a few ice patches in Flagstaff, but just enough to get gas and get on I-40 (sorry, I have a meeting to get to!)

Before I rushed to get to my meeting, I thought it would be nice to get off at the Winslow exit to ‘poke a peek’ at what was happening. I came across this building, which has a story behind it…







This is the ‘Route 66 Palace’ in Winslow – located right across the street from the Winslow Theater (the theater is for sale ya know!) and I stumbled upon the owner via a website dedicated to, his wife’s truck (??)

For those who do not know – I am restoring a 1949 Ford F-3 3/4 ton pickup truck, because I like to work on things. While looking for parts online, I came across an unusal 1948 Ford F-1 1/2 ton pickup truck, and it caught my eye.







The one on the left is hers – the one on the right is mine.

So, I tracked down the owner of the Route 66 Palace - Brian, and he and I spoke for about an hour about, well, Route 66 stuff!
I can tell you he is a welcome addition to the ‘owners club’ on the route, and he is going full steam ahead with the restoration of his building, which he told me he will use as a ‘getaway house’. So you might ask, what is he running from? The same type of thing anyone owning a summer cottage, a small home on the lake, or even a ski resort place, this one happens to be on the route!

He and I will meet in the near future!

After my meeting, I went to lunch at the Wayside Cafe in Holbrook for a quick bite. (sorry – no pics!) I have never been here before and the food wasn’t bad. It is truly a ‘mom and pop’ type of restaurant. Quick and easy. I had the Chicken Burrito – and it was good.

I wanted to leave the job early enough to get to Winslow and stop at a few places, but this would not be the case.

One of those stops was to the Old Trails Museum a few doors down from the ‘Standin on the Corner Gift Shop’







Alas, they were closed!
I always wanted to check it out inside and see what they have on display – maybe next time…

I ALWAYS stop in to my favorite LITTLE gift shop – the Standin’ on the Corner Gift Shop just to chat with the ladies and see what is happening in town. As usual, they were chock-full of knowledge.








I ended up buying a few things for my office (it is slowly becoming the ‘Corporate America Route 66 Shrine!’).

I said my good-byes and hurried over to the Meteor Crater Trading Post to check in… only to find they were closed! Um, it’s getting close to travel season folks! Extend the hours a little!







I keep checking out the ‘World’s Largest Map of Route 66′ mural to assess the work that could be done to it, and there will be quite a bit of work to do. They also want to do a few more things around the property – but that little ‘surprise’ will have to wait.

I felt I needed to get home, but as I was driving towards Flagstaff, I noticed a steel structure going up just north of Twin Arrows. Curious by nature, I got off the Twin Arrows exit and went the OTHER way away from the Trading Post and headed up the road. The road is abruptly closed off with gates and signs and warnings, and I slowly approached a couple who happened to be outside.

I asked them if this is where the new casino was being built and the older gentleman simply replied ‘Yep’. Then he proceeded to ask if I were ‘the media’… He told me the name of the new casino will be the Twin Arrows Resort and Casino - because Twin Arrows itself is trademarked, so they went with this name.








Notice they did not change the logo?

Now, here is the hope: If the casino is going up, I am wondering how long until the Hopi Tribe starts working on the Twin Arrows Diner, Trading Post and Gas Station!

There has always been talk of once the Navajo start the casino…. the Trading Post would be right behind it.

So I left and headed back to Scottsdale. Knowing in a few short days (tomorrow actually!) I am back on the road towards Needles to start recon on the 66 Motel sign so we can light that baby up!!

Feb 232012
 



Just happened to cruise CraigsList ane this popped up again! Last time I saw it for sale was in August of 2011 for $100,000.

Seemed they dropped the price a little. I would put money $50,000 buys it, but you would need another $100,000 to restore it and make it functional again!

Historic Minnetonka Trading Post on Old Route 66.
Liquor license #06090003

Previously a trading post, post office, gas station, feed store, rodeo/roping arena, and more, Minnetonka Trading Post Winslow and the surrounding areas for the last several decades. Originally built nearly a century ago, the building’s 2500 sqaure foot interior was gutted and a new roof has been installed.

The location is ideal for anyone looking for a business that will attract local customers, Route 66 buffs, Interstate 40 travelers, and Navajo/Hopi commuters on State Highway 87. The three acres for sale sit at the intersection of all three byways.

The main trading post building, with its unique petrified wood facade, includes A LIGHTED 50 x 15 BILLBOARD located off of I-40 that is in the renewal stage, and a well. The large billboard sits on the back part of the acreage along Interstate 40.

At the intersection of Old Route 66 / Interstate 40 and State Highway 87 RIGHT OFF THE EXIT.
101 E. Route 66, Winslow, AZ 86047

Quick Sale! Make an offer!

(928) 377-9190

Click HERE for the post and some pictures.

Aug 302011
 











I have (again) spoken with the current owner of the Diner Car in Winslow AZ and she sent me additional photos of both the exterior and the interior of the diner car.

This is her original Email to me:

Hi Ed,

Our diner is an authentic 1946 Valentine Diner, masters model, floor-plan #3.

It has to remain in its original location, and retains most of its original features, such as the lockbox (you can see features on Kansas State Historical Society’s website/Valentine Diners). We are in the process of renovation.

Any interested parties can contact us regarding our progress. The pictures attached were taken before work was begun. We are also in the process of getting it on the National Register of Historical Places, which will lower the property taxes and draw nationwide attention to the diner.

As is, we are asking $85,000, which includes the property (about 1/12 acre), located right on historic Rt. 66 and across from the famous La Posada Hotel. As more work is done, the price will increase. Please feel free to spread the word! Thanks so much for your assistance.

Sincerely,
Jessi

………….
Her Email contact is linkay09@gmail.com and please do not overwhelm her with Email other than those who are interested in purchasing – as this was a concern she had with me reaching out to everyone.

This is about three blocks away from the ‘Standing on the Corner’ park and the gift shop and there is plans to open up an old fashion soda shop across the street from the park – and RIGHT across the street from this diner car is the La Posada Hotel - which is ALWAYS packed.

As we all know – these diners are a RARE find along the route and I do expect this to be picked up by someone who truly loves the route and is looking to own a VERY important piece of it’s history…

Aug 102011
 

>



I have spoken with the current owner of the Diner Car in Winslow AZ and she followed up with this Email to me:



Hi Ed,

Our diner is an authentic 1946 Valentine Diner, masters model, floor-plan #3.

It has to remain in its original location, and retains most of its original features, such as the lockbox (you can see features on Kansas State Historical Society’s website/Valentine Diners). We are in the process of renovation.

Any interested parties can contact us regarding our progress. The pictures attached were taken before work was begun. We are also in the process of getting it on the National Register of Historical Places, which will lower the property taxes and draw nationwide attention to the diner.

As is, we are asking $85,000, which includes the property (about 1/12 acre), located right on historic Rt. 66 and across from the famous La Posada Hotel. As more work is done, the price will increase. Please feel free to spread the word! Thanks so much for your assistance.

Sincerely,
Jessi

………….
Her Email contact is linkay09@gmail.com and please do not overwhelm her with Email other than those who are interested in purchasing – as this was a concern she had with me reaching out to everyone.

This is ONE block away from the ‘Standing on the Corner’ park and the gift shop and there is plans to open up an old fashion soda shop across the street from the park – and RIGHT across the street from this diner car is the La Posada Hotel - which is ALWAYS packed.

As we all know – these diners are a RARE find along the route and I do expect this to be picked up by someone who truly loves the route and is looking to own a VERY important piece of it’s history…

Aug 092011
 



The Historic Route 66 Passport was recently awarded the prestigious Governor’s Tourism Award during the 2011 Governor’s Conference on Tourism held in Phoenix. For about a year, the passport has been available for fans of the historic landmark at the Williams-Forest Service Visitors Center. Route 66 communities from throughout the state are featured in the promotional tool, including Williams.

The passports are available for free at participating visitor’s centers along Route 66, and for those traveling on the Mother Road can have their passport stamped at each location along the Route. Acquiring all Route 66 stamps qualifies participants for a prize.

Besides having their passports stamped in various Route 66 communities, coupons may also be added to the passports, which can be slipped inside the pages to help draw visitors to particular area businesses.

Williams Main Street Coordinator Sue Atkinson said the passports have been very popular and it has been difficult to keep up with the demand.

Mary Barbee, visitor’s use assistant at the Williams Visitors Center agreed with Atkinson and said the public has had a positive response to the passports.

“They are really liking them,” she said. “We went through them like that.”

The Arizona Historic Route 66 Passport, spearheaded by the Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona (Association) on behalf of the Route 66 communities, received the distinguished Cooperative Marketing Award at a luncheon, which recognized 10 individuals and organizations for their best practices, accomplishments, and contributions to the Arizona tourism industry.

The Cooperative Marketing Award is presented to the project that best exemplifies creative partnerships to develop and execute a cooperative marketing initiative. The criteria used by the panel of judges to select the winner included demonstrating an exceptional effort, innovation, uniqueness, effective use of resources, measurable results, and its overall contribution to the tourism industry of Arizona.

According to the Association’s press release, The Historic Route 66 Passport is the first joint marketing effort between all the communities across Arizona’s stretch of Route 66. The Association said while the overall goal for the Passport Program is to increase visitation to the Route 66 communities, attractions, and businesses across northern Arizona, a major objective has been to demonstrate the power of working together.

The Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona, founded in 1987 to preserve, protect, and promote Arizona’s Route 66, oversees the Passport Program, however, according to the Association’s press release, it was the financial contributions of so many that made this project a reality.

All communities across the Route were represented in this marketing tool thanks to a grant from the Arizona Office of Tourism, and generous contributions from the Hualapai Lodge in Peach Springs, Hualapai Tourism, the Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona, Kingman Chamber of Commerce, Flagstaff Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, Winslow Chamber of Commerce, Williams’ Main Street Association, and the Holbrook Chamber of Commerce.

Aug 032011
 

Found this on CraigsList of all places:

Historic Minnetonka Trading Post on Old Route 66.

Previously a trading post, post office, gas station, feed store, rodeo/roping arena, and more, Minnetonka Trading Post Winslow and the surrounding areas for the last several decades. Originally built nearly a century ago, the building’s 2500 sqaure foot interior was gutted and a new roof has been installed.

The location is ideal for anyone looking for a business that will attract local customers, Route 66 buffs, Interstate 40 travelers, and Navajo/Hopi commuters on State Highway 87. The three acres for sale sit at the intersection of all three byways.

The main trading post building, with its unique petrified wood façade, includes A LIGHTED 50 x 15 BILLBOARD located off of I-40 that is in the renewal stage, and a well. There are three outbuildings in back. The large billboard sits on the back part of the acreage along Interstate 40.

At the intersection of Old Route 66 Interstate 40 and State Highway 87 RIGHT OFF THE EXIT.101 E. Route 66, Winslow, AZ 86047

WHERE ROUTE 66 ENDS AND THE FUN BEGINS

Quick Sale! $100,000 – Make an offer!

(928) 377-9190

Click HERE for the post and some pictures.

Aug 022011
 



WINSLOW – Some Winslow residents and business owners are trying to transform their community into a tourist destination, hoping to lure drivers off neighboring highways.

The revitalization efforts are part of a federal- and state-funded $10 million renaissance project to be completed by 2015 that aims to rejuvenate the town’s tourism industry, said Bob Hall, Winslow Chamber of Commerce CEO.

The northeastern Arizona town was once a bustling rural community that benefited from the foot traffic generated by those driving on Route 66, which cuts through the town. But the community has faltered since neighboring Interstate 40 was completed in the 1980s, offering drivers a faster option – one that circumvents the community.

“Everybody talked about how Winslow used to be. But that’s not the case anymore,” Hall said. “We feel like it’s our turn. We see more of a future.”

Recently, Hall led a group of about 20 people on a tour through Winslow, four hours northeast of Phoenix, population about 10,000. Stops along the tour included the Standin’ on the Corner Park, a homage to the Eagles’ 1973 hit song “Take It Easy,” which references the town’s intersection of Kinsley Avenue and Second Street, and the recently restored La Posada Hotel.

Most were members of the Route 66 Association of Arizona, founded in 1987 to promote tourism along Arizona’s Route 66 corridor. They wanted to see if Winslow’s efforts could work in their communities.

Hall pointed out the improvements: new Route 66 benches, road repavements and plans to expand Standin’ on the Corner Park offerings, including a new outdoor stage.

Built by local volunteers, the park is a popular tourist photo spot that opened in 1999, Hall said.

“They promised to embrace their Route 66 roots,” said Sharlene Fouser, Route 66 Association of Arizona president. “And they’re delivering.”

Hard times
Signs of economic struggle remain throughout Winslow.

A former taqueria’s windows are boarded, inked with graffiti. The Winslow Theater’s marquee reads, “For sale.”

About one in five local residents lacks a high-school diploma and unemployment is 14.4 percent, according to the latest census data.

“There’s not enough here in Winslow. We need more business and jobs,” said mail carrier Arlin Rogers, 49, a father of three. “We spend our money raising our kids here, but they have to go somewhere else to work.”

Winslow wasn’t always this way. A clipping from a 1960s local newspaper ad promotes a Jackson Five concert there. The boys’ grandfather lived in the area.

A black-and-white photograph of nearly 300 kids riding bikes in a Fourth of July parade hangs in the town’s one-room museum.

This was before I-40 stole much of Route 66′s traffic, crushing Winslow’s economy.

“You could’ve rolled a bowling ball through town and not hit anything,” said 83-year-old Marie LaMar, who has lived in Winslow nearly her entire life.

She said Winslow is in a new era, which began in the 1990s when a couple of outsiders, including Hall, moved into town.

Hall arrived in Winslow in 1991, about the same time the Standin’ on the Corner Park was being built. He was a caretaker. Doctors said his patient had a year to live. The patient lived another eight years. By then, Hall had fallen in love with Winslow.

“It was a new life for me,” he said.Winslow is united, that’s what I fell in love with. And there’s a history.”

Mormon leader Brigham Young sent settlers in the 1800s to colonize the area, which later became a railroad town. Hall estimated that a third of workers in town today work in the railroad industry.

Allan Affeldt, an artist from Orange County, Calif., said he moved to Winslow in 1997 with his wife, Tina Mion, to turn an abandoned structure into La Posada Hotel.

“In the O.C., I was living behind the orange curtain and grew tired of that,” Affeldt said. Winslow has rough edges, but it’s the real world.”

But he said Winslow had given up and locals were skeptical. The idea of tourism in Winslow seemed far-fetched. But La Posada’s and the park’s success changed their minds.

Even Disney and Pixar took notice.
Executives stayed at La Posada to research the 2006 digitally animated feature film “Cars,” a story of a talking automobile that finds meaning in a Route 66 town, Affeldt said. Winslow residents are acknowledged in the film’s credits.

Today the 48-room hotel is 85 percent occupied year-round, Affeldt said. And dozens of tourists take photographs at the park daily, Hall said.

“We couldn’t have done better if we hired someone from Madison Avenue,” LaMar said.

‘Change the mind-set’
Winslow real-estate agent Lawrence Kenna, 51, said he noticed the renovation of La Posada Hotel on a drive home from work in 2000. But during the same drive he passed a gas station with a sign stating, “God hates Winslow.”

“I told my mom, ‘Either I want to make a difference or I want to move,’ ” Kenna said.

The third-generation Winslow native stayed.

That same week, he bought the gas-station property and got rid of the sign. A beauty parlor will open before year’s end where the gas station once operated.

The store’s owner, Marcia Garnett, said she’s trying to convince locals that they don’t have to go to Phoenix for a quality spa experience.

“You have to change the mindset,” she said.

Since purchasing the first property, Kenna purchased six additional lots along Winslow’s Route 66 corridor.

Now, they are souvenir shops, boutiques and a cafe. An outdoor garden stands where an abandoned bar once existed. Kenna said some of the stores’ architecture reflects Winslow’s diversity. The building’s Native American bricks were restored with plaster in a Mexican style. The decorative Christian crucifix is built of wood from a Western ranch.

The outdoor garden is a popular spot for tourists and locals, particularly during Winslow Summer Nights, which are held biweekly and feature local entertainment, Kenna said.

During these events, LaMar and a group of female volunteers from the Winslow Harvey Girls promote Winslow history.

They’re named after Fred Harvey, who founded a group of restaurants called Harvey Houses along the Southwest, including Winslow, starting in the late 1880s.

They provide free tours and presentations of Winslow landmarks, including La Posada Hotel, and of the historic Route 66 to keep the region’s history alive.

And LaMar said they end meetings with a quote from Margaret Mead, the Philadelphia-born anthropologist: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world.”

“Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

by Kevin Cirilli – The Arizona Republic

May 312011
 



I had the opportunity to speak in front of 900 attendees at Ignite Phoenix 10 in Scottsdale. Click HERE to watch the video!

The premise is you get 5 minutes, 20 slides, and speak without cue cards, a teleprompter, or anything to rely on. Just your memory. The slides are timed at 15 second intervals, and you do not know when your 15 seconds are up – so timing is everything! I was first on stage out of 18 presenters – so I did what anyone would have done – prayed, took a deep breath, and headed out to the stage!

The presentation was to get 2 messages across: 1) Route 66 is still there! 2) here is a SMALL part of what you will see on Route 66 - so get out there!!

I was approached by SO MANY attendees afterwards telling me how they have traveled it in the past, or about the people and places they have met, or how they now want to travel it, or simply – they didn’t know it was still drivable! My point got across!

Now, it is hard to remember everything when you are standing in front of a packed auditorium, alone on the stage with only your slides behind you, and your mouth and brain racing to see which one gets the point out first!

As you can see, a few times the mouth won over the brain, and a few things got jumbled – so don’t hold it against me!

I truly want to thank David Schwartz for providing me most of the pictures for the slides – they served their purpose better than I expected – and only help me getting my presentation to the next level.

As I said in the last few seconds – ‘I hope to see you on the road!’