Volunteer registration is now open for Williams Route 66 Marathon.

 Arizona, Daily  Comments Off on Volunteer registration is now open for Williams Route 66 Marathon.
Aug 222012
 





Get behind the scenes and help provide a unique experience!

Thousands of people around the world will train for months to get to the Williams Route 66 Marathon, presented by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma. However, without the help of approximately 1,500 volunteers, these individuals are unable to cross the starting line, much less the finish line.

Volunteers are particularly needed at packet pick-up, in the information tent, at Gatorade stops, relay stations and the finish line. Volunteers also play a key role along the course, where they make a lasting impression on the participants.

From humor to encouragement, every volunteer brings his or her own personality to the race. Each role is equally important – and rewarding. Volunteers at the Williams Route 66 Marathon return to assist year after year, making lifelong friends and creating moments that last forever.

Many corporations and organizations provide volunteers on an annual basis, using it as an opportunity to brand their company, express their corporate personality and demonstrate their local presence.

Volunteers receive special perks, including a goodie bag and a volunteer shirt. In addition, volunteers are invited to attend the Williams Route 66 Marathon Volunteer Thank You Party on Nov. 27.

Register today to join our efforts behind the scenes. For more information about our volunteer opportunities, contact our Volunteer Director, Amy Berry, at amy@route66marathon.com.

Click HERE to Volunteer

Mother Road Marathon planned for third year

 Daily, Oklahoma  Comments Off on Mother Road Marathon planned for third year
Jan 092012
 



Planning is under way for the third Mother Road Marathon, despite a drop last year in the number of participants.

Last year’s Mother Road Marathon cost the city about $31,000 after paying all the bills for the event, according to figures compiled by the Joplin Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Income, mostly from entry fees, amounted to $32,719, while expenses totaled $63,678, according to Patrick Tuttle, director of the tourism bureau.

It was the second year for the event. The marathon is promoted as the only one along historic Route 66 that treks through three states, starting at Commerce, Okla., going through Cherokee County, Kan., and ending in Joplin.

In 2010, the local bureau spent $30,000, with $20,000 going to hire a promoter, Reinke Sports Group of Winter Park, Fla., to attract participants and provide the awards, prizes and final ceremonies for the inaugural marathon. The city’s relationship with Reinke Sports Group dissolved in a disagreement over ownership of the marketing rights and responsibilities for the labor to put on the run. The city ended up paying Reinke an additional $30,000 to settle those claims and to ensure that it owned the marketing rights.

Dean Reinke was allowed to collect entry fees for the first run, but he also paid much of the costs, including advertising and prizes, said former bureau director Vince Lindstrom. Lindstrom said Reinke never disclosed what he took in or spent from the entry fees. Entry fees have ranged from $30 to $60, depending on the event entered. The initial run attracted about 1,500 participants. Tuttle said last year’s event drew 641 runners: 138 for the full marathon, 292 for the half-marathon and 211 for the 5K run.

Tuttle attributed the decrease in runners last year largely to the impact of the May 22 tornado.

“The perception of some runners was the race wasn’t going to happen, and that was hard to overcome once implanted,” he said. There was a misperception that lodging and restaurants would not be available to the runners, and that volunteers would be focused on tornado recovery and would not be available to put on the event, he said.

Marketing of the event also got a late start because of the dispute with Reinke and the retirement of race founder Lindstrom.

As for expenses last year, costs associated with producing the race such as course certification, equipment, traffic control, transportation for runners before and after the race, and other services and materials amounted to nearly $31,000, according to Tuttle’s figures.

Other categories of expenses included advertising, about $18,000; meals and festivities, including awards, food, beverages and entertainment for the runners, $10,000; and costs to maintain and buy software for the event’s website, nearly $5,000.

Tuttle said the date of this year’s event is Sunday, Oct. 14. That date was selected to keep the event from conflicting with the Chicago Marathon, which is slated for Oct. 7 and draws thousands of runners.

Tuttle has already launched advertising to try to attract runners and plans to attend regional running events to help get the word out. He said the Joplin Roadrunners club is assisting with that effort.

By Debby Woodin – Globe Staff Writer The Joplin Globe