Dec 122013
 

rancho-cucamongo-preservation









The preservation of the Richfield Gas Station in Rancho Cucamongo CA.

I posted back in March of this year the work to restore the historic Cucamonga Service Station on Route 66 in Rancho Cucamonga CA.

The Route 66 Inland Empire California nonprofit group owns the propery after it was deeded to them by the Lamar sign company.

The nonprofit was formed to save the structure and members intend to renovate and rebuild the gas station to what it looked like during its business heyday in the first part of the 20th century.

“It’s really exciting to see the community want to see this gas station, this service station, come back to its golden years,” said Anthony Gonzalez, president of the Route 66 IECA.

A main goal of the organization is to turn the site of the old Richfield service station into a landmark Rancho Cucamonga tourist destination and museum for Route 66 fans and travelers from all over the world.

Known as the Cucamonga Service Station, it opened in the 1910s and provided service up to the 1970s.

The group plans to bring back the old gravity-fed pumps from the 1930s, and possibly have old signs, oil cans, souvenirs, and literature related to Route 66 for visitors and the community.

The group’s members had been concerned about the fate of the old building in recent years. A larger adjoining garage in the rear had been demolished in the recent past.

Group members say the plan is raise money with the help of the public to restore the gas station and rebuild the demolished garage. The hope is to have something open by 2015 in time for the 100 year anniversary of the station.

Lamar has donated the land to the nonprofit, and the company should get a tax break from the deal.

The group will also look to the state and federal government to assist in available grants.

I am so happy to see another historic property being not only saved – but restored to its former glory.

As we all know – I am about preserving history! ESPECIALLY Route 66 history…

 

You can visit their website at http://route66ieca.org/ or visit their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/Route66IECA

Jun 012013
 





I do hope they reopen the restaurant (and orange juice stand) one day in the near future as I know EVERYONE will want to stop and get a chance to experience this place….

On a day when Fontana was celebrating its 100th birthday, Joe Bono on Friday did just what his family has done for the last 77 years: He offered his hospitality to tourists traveling on Route 66.
Sitting along the parking lot of Bono’s Old Route 66 restaurant on Foothill Boulevard was something Glen Heitritter and Linda Swenson of Omaha, Neb., had not yet seen on their ride down the Mother Road.

They stopped to take a look at the Big Orange, a 7-foot-high stucco ball from which thirsty travelers could buy glasses of fresh orange juice before the age of the freeway.

After the couple posed for the requisite photo, Bono gave them a tour of his place.

An attorney and former deputy district attorney, Bono grew up at the rear of the property at the corner of Sultana Avenue. A neighbor suggested to his mother in 1936 that she ought to sell juice to travelers along Foothill, which at the time had plenty of vineyards but was short on any places to stop for refreshment.

“It was all you could drink for 10 cents,” he told me in an interview some time ago.

That evolved into an Italian market and ultimately a restaurant. Especially during the Great Depression, Mama Bono would hear lots of hard-luck stories from many weary, and penniless, travelers seeking a new life in California and often fed them for free.

For Heitritter and Swanson, the Big Orange proved the perfect Route 66 distraction.

In their striking red Pontiac GTO — naturally, a 1966 model — they have traveled what remains of Route 66 since picking it up first in Carthage, Mo.

Among the notable experiences they’ve had was spending a night in one of the storied Wigwam Motels — with rooms shaped like teepees — in Holbrook, Ariz. They had passed the Inland Empire’s Wigwam Motel on the western edge of San Bernardino a few moments before pulling into Bono’s parking lot.

Before leaving for the end of the road at Santa Monica Pier that afternoon, they viewed Bono’s restaurant and its array of photographs and mementoes.

On a wall is a picture of young Joe and his father working in the vineyards not far away.

“Everything you see out there was vineyards,” he told the visitors, pointing out the windows toward Foothill.

But now Bono has big plans for his landmark business.

Looking over architect’s drawings, Bono said the restaurant, whose front windows are just a few feet shy of the now-four-lane Foothill Boulevard, will be moved south back from the highway. This will accommodate widening of the street as well as the construction of a huge warehouse planned on the other side of Sultana.

He said he was confident that Bono’s restaurant would reopen in the near future, to accommodate Fontana’s next century and for future travelers seeking the romance and adventure of Route 66.

By Joe Blackstock – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Mar 202013
 







GLAD to see this thing coming all together – wished I lived a LITTLE closer to it!!

RANCHO CUCAMONGA–Work to restore the historic Cucamonga Service Station on Route 66 in Rancho Cucamonga is revving up after a kick off ceremony held on Wednesday.

The Route 66 Inland Empire California nonprofit group now owns the the propery after it was deeded to them by the Lamar sign company earlier this year.

The nonprofit was formed to save the structure and members intend to renovate and rebuild the gas station to what it looked like during its business heyday in the first part of the 20th century.

“It’s really exciting to see the community want to see this gas station, this service station, come back to its golden years,” said Anthony Gonzalez, president of the Route 66 IECA.

A main goal of the organization is to turn the site of the old Richfield service station into a landmark Rancho Cucamonga tourist destination and museum for Route 66 fans and travelers from all over the world.

Known as the Cucamonga Service Station, it opened in the 1910s and provided service up to the 1970s, he said.

Gonzalez said the group plans to bring back the old gravity-fed pumps from the 1930s, and possibly have old signs, oil cans, souvenirs, and literature related to Route 66 for visitors and the community.

The group’s members had been concerned about the fate of the old building in recent years. A larger adjoining garage in the rear had been demolished in the recent past.

Group members say the plan is raise money with the help of the public to restore the gas station and rebuild the demolished garage. Gonzalez said the hope is to have something open by 2015 in time for the 100 year anniversary of the station.

“We open the door to whoever would like to come in and assist us and bring this dream, this historic station, back to its golden years,” Gonzalez said.

Lamar has donated the land to the nonprofit, and the company should get a tax break from the deal, Gonzalez said.

Gonzalez said his group will also look to the state and federal government to assist in available grants.

By Neil Nisperos – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Aug 162012
 


We were there most of the weekend EXCEPT for Saturday as we took a drive out to Santa Monica (via Route 66 of course) – but the attendance on Friday was very low…

VICTORVILLE • The Route 66 International Festival 2012 attracted a little more than 5,000 people during this past weekend, disappointing organizers and businesses who expected a much bigger turnout.

Some of them blamed the above-100-degree heat for low attendance, while others criticized a lack of organization and marketing.

The festival attracted about 800 paid visitors Friday and 4,000 on Saturday at the San Bernardino County Fairgrounds, where a gourmet food-truck show, a classic car show, live entertainment and military vehicle exhibits took place, according to Vince Sapina, the festival’s media and PR chair. About 350 people attended a mixer and tours in Barstow on Thursday.

After the Daily Press ran an article in April stating that Sapina’s co-chair estimated 6,500 visitors and 40 vendors, Sapina asked for a correction saying he was expecting 30,000 attendees and 90 vendors.

Marc Melloul, general manager of the Green Tree Inn, which hosted banquets during the weekend, said his hotel saw a 30-percent increase in the number of reservations.

Paul Chassey, a volunteer at the California Route 66 Museum in Old Town, said the museum saw more visitors during the weekend than usual.

“I had a great time,” Chassey said. “I was really impressed by the food trucks.”

But Carmen Andalon, sales and catering manager at the Ambassador Hotel in Victorville, said she didn’t feel any positive impact from the festival despite offering coupons and special rates. She thinks the festival should have been publicized more.

“I was looking forward to this event, to get more business from it,” Andalon said. “I get more revenue from a small wedding in town.”

People involved in the festival gave conflicting accounts as to how Victorville was chosen among other Route 66 California cities to host this event in the middle of August. The festival is held each year in one of eight states the Mother Road runs through.

The festival committee initially announced in December that the Green Tree Inn was chosen to host a classic car show during the festival with food and merchandise vendors. But after going through a few leadership changes, Sapina took over in March.

“Maybe we could have moved it down the hill, but we thought Victorville needed this,” Sapina said. “I think we built a good event. I just think that the heat wave and local demographics made it difficult. I think we did a great job and want to thank all the volunteers.”

The festival hosted the first gourmet food-truck show in the Victor Valley.

Gourmet food trucks are different from traditional food trucks as onboard chefs cook and serve creative dishes such as a lobster corn dog. These trucks have gained popularity in recent years, especially in Los Angeles and Orange counties.

“The expectation was far greater than the turnout,” said Rick Singerman, who owns the Maui Wowi LA smoothie truck.

Maui Wowi was among 15 vendors that attended the festival on Friday when there was hardly any line at each truck. Singerman said he lost money that day driving up from Los Angeles County.

“I don’t know why it was scheduled for Friday and Saturday and not Saturday and Sunday,” Singerman said.

Sapina said he sat down with the vendors Friday night and told them he would cancel additional trucks coming Saturday to avoid competition. Singerman said he returned Saturday and barely made a profit.

Keith Kahn, president of Inland Empire Gourmet Food Trucks, which organized the gourmet food-truck show, said he booked too many trucks based on the organizers’ estimate. The Inland Empire Gourmet Food Trucks offered to refund booking fees for Friday to the gourmet food trucks.

“If we only had 10 trucks on Saturday, we probably would have had 10 happy trucks,” Kahn said.

Daniel Tate helped organize military vehicle exhibits, which he said attracted 2,500 visitors.

“I think what they should have done is work with local nonprofits and they could have made it more attractive to a lot more people. They have a huge following,” Tate said.

Tomoya Shimura, Staff Writer – Victorville Daily Press