Route 66 Landmark to Become TEEMCO National Headquarters

 Daily, Oklahoma  Comments Off on Route 66 Landmark to Become TEEMCO National Headquarters
Aug 192013
 






The Gold Dome building based on Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome will be preserved. TEEMCO, an Oklahoma-based environmental professional engineering firm has purchased the architecturally historic Gold Dome building located on legendary Route 66.

As one of the first geodesic domes in the world, the Gold Dome is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Built in 1958, the building’s architects (Bailey, Bozalis, Dickinson, and Roloff) utilized Buckminster Fuller’s geodesic dome design. It was the third geodesic dome building ever built in the world. Architect, philosopher, author, engineer and futurist, Buckminster Fuller explored the use of nature’s constructing principles to find design solutions.

While he was not the first architect to build a geodesic dome, he was awarded a U.S. Patent for his dome structure. It was a dome of many firsts: the first dome to have a gold-anodized aluminum roof, the first above-ground geodesic dome, and the first Kaiser Aluminum dome used as a bank and was billed as the “Bank of Tomorrow.” The building’s complex web of gold hexagons represented the bright optimism for America’s new frontier in space. It was also intended to reflect Oklahoma’s legacy in aviation and space.

The dome’s exuberant form of modernism can’t be found anywhere else in America today. The Gold Dome has been featured on The History Channel, in The Atlantic Monthly, Los Angeles Times, Preservation magazine, and numerous other publications. TEEMCO will move sixty-five of its national-headquarters staff from Edmond, Oklahoma into the 27,000 square-foot landmark in late 2013.

“Our company believes the building should be preserved for future generations to appreciate,” said Greg Lorson, CEO of TEEMCO. “Revitalizing the Gold Dome reflects our core belief in protecting the environment; whether natural or manmade.” Lorson explained, “We intend to restore as many original elements to the building as possible while introducing some new complimentary elements to the interior. I can’t disclose details, but I will tell you we plan to install a water feature in the interior lobby along with a high-tech feature. In the end, we want the building to represent a coming together of nature, physics, art, and technology. In this way the building will be functional art communicating the value of man’s positive impact on our environment.”

It will be renamed the TEEMCO Gold Dome. The TEEMCO Foundation will soon host a groundbreaking event for the Gold Dome. The Foundation exists to benefit people in need of health, education, and welfare support.

The groundbreaking event will be a fundraiser to help Moore area tornado relief efforts and an Oklahoma woman in dire need of a kidney transplant. TEEMCO is the nation’s leading environmental engineering firm for the oil, gas, agriculture, and marine industries. The company has also developed several proprietary software solutions for environmental compliance management and risk management.

Oklahoma City Gold Dome Safe for Now

 Daily, Oklahoma  Comments Off on Oklahoma City Gold Dome Safe for Now
Apr 072013
 






Another great guest article about a Route 66 historical place……

The month of March was a tumultuous one for a historical landmark along Route 66 in the Asian district of Oklahoma City. Dave Box, the owner of the Gold Dome, applied for a demolition permit in early March after purchasing the structure at a sheriff’s auction in September. Box told News 9 in Oklahoma City that the permit is the only way he can “keep his options open” when he discovered the building would require extensive maintenance and repairs. The application was denied because any exterior renovations require approval by the city’s Urban Design Committee. Public backlash and reluctance by the city to approve any sort of changes to the dome has tempered Box’s plans for the time being.

History of the Dome

The Gold Dome was built in 1958 as a Citizens State Bank branch. The building, which is on the National Register of Historical Places, is one of only five geodesic domes in the world, according to GoldDomeOKC.net. It was designed by Robert Roloff to not only provide a unique structure for a bank at the time, but also reflect the “golden” future of the state itself. The roof is constructed of 625 individual anodized aluminum panels that were originally a very shiny gold. The panels have faded over the years due to weather and heat. The structure was built shortly after Interstate 35 was completed and State Highway 66A became the official Route 66 at the time. The old route would have required a new set of BFGoodrich tires on your vehicle, as it had become a rough road to travel throughout the years.

How We Got Here

Box, who also owns a local country club and a talent agency, paid $800,000 for the building after the previous owner, Dr. Irene Lam, was foreclosed on. The Gold Dome is currently home to a business complex, cultural center, restaurant and office space for various businesses. Box told The Oklahoman that he may not have done as much due diligence as he should have before purchasing the building. He acknowledged that he does not want to go down in history as the person responsible for destroying a historical Route 66 landmark, but he also does not want to lose money on an investment he’s already second-guessing.

Debate Continues

One architecture blog noted that Oklahoma City is already trying to destroy Mummers Theater, built by renowned architect John Johansen. Now the city is doubling down, trying to destroy two historical sites. A Facebook page called Save OKC’s Historic Gold Dome was created in March and has already attracted over 500 followers.

Box has said he will pay someone $100,000 to take the dome off his property so he can use it as he pleases. But the city responded that the same permits which they already rejected, would be required for that to happen.

(Photo courtesy of Flickr user QuesterMark)

By: Katherine Reed
Kat loves being a freelance writer and making her own schedule.