Oct 262015
 

victorville-20-anniversary








Victorville landmark draws in locals for celebration and car show

A local landmark that more often garners a mostly international audience drew in hundreds of locals Saturday to celebrate its 20-year anniversary of preserving the history of “The Mother Road.”
The mission of the California Route 66 Museum in Old Town Victorville is to “preserve and increase” interest in “all aspects of history and heritage related to the road,” which it has been doing since it opened its doors in 1995. With three display rooms and a gift shop, the 5,000-square-foot former Red Rooster Cafe location remains entirely free for admission, accepting contributions from patrons and donors.

Museum President Susan Bridges said it’s unfortunate that “all the locals don’t know this place at all.”
Bridges said that about 75 percent of the museum’s business comes from visitors from all around the world.
“We want to let people know that this used to be a prime area,” Bridges said.
She said the ongoing Victor Valley Wastewater Reclamation Authority construction project has taken a large toll on Old Town shops, including the Best Deal Furniture store that recently closed its doors after 20 years of business.
Best Deal joined the row of 17 other buildings between A and D streets on the east side of Seventh Street that were once open businesses that have shuttered their doors, according to a previous Daily Press article.
The museum continues to thrive however, and with Route 66 turning 90 years old next year, it will likely gain even greater attention.

California Historic Route 66 Association board member Scott Piotrowski traveled from Glendale to attend the Victorville museum anniversary celebration, providing information about the group to attendees.
The big buzz for the association is the Route 66 90-year anniversary national festival planned to take place in Los Angeles next year. Piotrowski said they expect at least 50,000 attendees at the festival, but are hoping for more than 100,000.

The main event of Saturday’s celebration was the car show, an annual display of classic cars ranging from hot rods to rat rides.
Among the cars was a 1963 Ford Galaxie replica of the Mayberry Sheriff’s car used in the Andy Griffith Show, and a unique 1936 Ford Custom pickup truck with a 1983 Volvo built in a custom rod shop.

A celebrity of the Route 66 community was also at the event, National Classic Miss Route 66, Monica Burrola, decked in her sash and stetson to sign and take photos with visitors.
Burrola said she didn’t know a lot about the road when her son’s girlfriend asked her to participate in the pageant for the Classic Miss Route 66 for women more than 50 years old.
The next thing you know, I had a love for the road,” Burrola said. “The coolest part is all of the people on the highway.”

By Charity Lindsey – Desert Dispatch

May 062013
 




KINGMAN – Just call it The Gathering.

Roughly 10,000 people attend the Route 66 International Festival held each summer. Those disciples of the Mother Road – and their tourist dollars – could descend on the city en masse as Kingman is considered one of the favorites to host the event in 2014.

Such a gathering would have an undoubtedly positive affect on the city’s economy, but pulling off such a large-scale production will take teamwork by a number of public and private entities as well as residents.

Author Jim Hinckley and downtown Kingman booster Steve Wagner, both Route 66 and Kingman enthusiasts, seek volunteers to serve on committees that would work on specific aspects of the event, from drawing live bands, organizing car shows, food and beverage vendors and Route 66 beautification.

“It began almost 20 years ago in a rented tent in the faded wide spot in the road that is Landegrin, Texas,” said Hinckley of the International Festival now managed by the Route 66 Alliance.

A different community hosts the event each year.

Kingman is a front-runner to serve as the host city,” said Hinckley.

The men are banking on approval with the end game of pulling off a successful festival that highlights Kingman’s attraction as a destination.

If Kingman does land the hosting gig, the event would be held in conjunction with the August 2014 edition of Chillin’ on Beale Street, said Hinckley.

The initial plan, he said, calls for a Saturday car show, an exhibition of artists and authors in the Southwest whose work focuses on Route 66, a barbecue at Hualapai Mountain Park and live music.

The event, said Hinckley, “would introduce visitors to some of the community’s unique attractions, such as the Stetson Winery and the award-wining Desert Diamond Distillery.”

This August the festival is in Joplin, Mo. Last year it was in Victorville, Calif., and the year before that it was in Amarillo, Texas.

“We like to move it around,” said Rick Freeland of the Alliance.

Freeland confirmed Kingman is the front-runner, but an announcement won’t be made until Aug. 3, the final day of the Joplin festival.

“This will be great for Kingman,” said Freeland. “Every town or city that has hosted the event has seen a significant bump in the local economy. And this is a true international event. Route 66 truly does have a global following.”

Freeland said the Alliance’s primary goal is to double the number of cars that travel Route 66 between Los Angeles and Chicago.

If you’re interested in helping out, call Hinckley at (928) 530-7899 or Wagner at (928) 377-2239.

By Doug McMurdo – Daily Miner

Apr 242013
 




SAN BERNARDINO — Two months after the annual Route 66 Rendezvous car show stalled out, one of its organizers said she’s jump-started the show – and is moving it to Ontario under a new name.
Shelly McNaul, who previously served as the director of special events for the San Bernardino Convention and Visitors Bureau, announced the move Saturday on the Route 66 Rendezvous Facebook page.

“I will be continuing under another name called the ‘Route 66 Reunion’ that will be a three-day car show modeled after the Route 66 Rendezvous scheduled for the same weekend, Sept. 20 to 22, 2013,” her post read in part.

The event, which pays tribute to classic cars, hotrods and the famous Mother Road itself, has been huge in San Bernardino for more than two decades, drawing thousands of visitors from outside of the city, filling local hotel rooms and filling local businesses with customers.

Jim Gerstenslager, chairman of the board for the San Bernardino Convention and Visitors Bureau – which stopped day-to-day operations in March – said the Route 66 Rendezvous is San Bernardino’s signature event and nobody ever talked to him about it.

“We can’t stop people from having their own event as long as they don’t infringe on our trademark,” Gerstenslager said. “Our Convention and Visitors Bureau owns the name and Stater Bros., as title sponsor, owns Stater Bros. Route 66 Rendezvous. We’re sticking to it and it’s absolute. “

In Ontario, which is actually a few miles south of the original Route 66, Gerstenslager’s counterpart was already gearing up for the launch of an Ontario event, which the city sees as its own way to attract visitors.

“We’re finalizing details on bringing it to Ontario under a different name,” said Michael Krouse, president and CEO of the Ontario Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Krouse went on to say, “It’s a great opportunity to bring visitors to our city, and the goal is to make it bigger and better. “

McNaul had hoped to move the event – which attracted hundreds of thousands of visitors to San Bernardino each summer – to Glen Helen Regional Park, she wrote, but will instead be moving it to Euclid Avenue in Ontario. McNaul has been hired by the Ontario Convention Center and Visitors Bureau, she said. The San Bernardino convention center announced in February that, after 22 years, this year’s Route 66 Rendezvous was canceled because of a lack of funding. In early 2012, Gov. Jerry Brown shut down redevelopment agencies around the state, and redevelopment funds had previously been used to help cover clean-up and security at the event. Several months later, the city declared bankruptcy.

“The challenges with doing the car show on the downtown streets of San Bernardino became greater with an unpleasant element at night,” McNaul said. “We want to give the car enthusiast back the freedom they once had to relax and enjoy the reunion of family and friends while sitting next to their babe. “

Public safety staffing has been an issue in the city.

Between declaring bankruptcy in July 2012 and March 2013, the city lost 285 employees, nearly one in four, including dozens of police officers. Police emergency response time has risen 30 seconds, to 5.4 minutes, and non-emergency calls now average a 30-minute response time.

That hasn’t stopped San Bernardino organizers from organizing something.

Meanwhile, an alternative car show, Rendezvous Back to Route 66, is scheduled for the same weekend at San Manuel Baseball Stadium in San Bernardino. The car show is being planned by the San Bernardino Area Chamber of Commerce and car clubs, including Over the Hill Gang, according to chamber president and CEO Judi Penman.

“It’s already on the car club calendar,” Penman said. “We’ve had a great response so far, with people coming forward to participate.”

Ontario organizers are keeping the spirit of the original Rendezvous.

In her post, McNaul wrote that the Route 66 Reunion will have the same “elements” as the Rendezvous, with vendors, entertainment and a continuous three-mile cruise route looping around Euclid Avenue, from Holt Boulevard to 6th Street.

She added that the surroundings are ideal, with Euclid having three lanes to park cars on both sides and cruise down the middle. Businesses, historic homes and a grass median provide trees for shade for the crowd.

“It really has a great feel, and I think it would be a perfect location for the car participants,” she wrote.

McNaul will be mailing out vehicle entry forms in May, she wrote.

By Beua Yarbrough and Michel Nolan – The Sun

Apr 182013
 





Route 66 tourism has become a multimillion dollar business in this country, and thanks to a small group of local historians and city officials, Edwardsville is working to raise awareness on a national and international level. Below are some of the ways Edwardsville will showcase its Route 66 heritage this year.


Route 66 Experience Hub

For several weeks motorists at the corner of Schwarz and West Streets have wondered about the mysterious structure beneath a large blue tarp at the side of the road. Saturday morning at 11 a.m. the cover will be removed for all to see. A Route 66 Experience Hub, one of only 13 in Illinois, will be revealed at the site of the former Idlewood Tourist Camp, a favorite stop for tourists and locals along Route 66.

The public is invited to attend the dedication. Area residents with vintage vehicles that may have driven Route 66 are encouraged to bring their restored vehicles. Brief remarks by Mayor Gary Niebur and William Kelly, director of Illinois Scenic Byway, will be followed by a ribbon cutting and unveiling of the new Route 66 Experience Hub.

Awareness of the Edwardsville Route 66 experience will be raised thanks to the work of City Planner Scott Hanson, Alderman Barb Stamer, the Historic Preservation Commission and other city officials who worked with the Illinois Route 66 Scenic Byway to design panels for the structure and bring the Route 66 Experience Hub to Edwardsville. Edwardsville is the sixth city along the route to install their exhibit.

The design of the structure was influenced by the fins of 1950s era automobiles. Attached to the “fin” are three panels, a large map showing the path of Route 66 through Illinois and two smaller panels showing local and regional attractions and Route 66 history. While reading about the Route 66 experience in Edwardsville, visitors can listen to Bobby Troup’s “Get Your Kicks on Route 66.”

The experience hubs also feature a tactile station where visitors can make a pencil rubbing of a design unique to each city. In Edwardsville the design is the Centennial Monument in City Park.

 

Illinois Route 66 Hall of Fame

This week word was received that Edwardsville’s nomination of George Cathcart for the Illinois Route 66 Hall of Fame has been accepted. In 1922 George Cathcart and his wife purchased the Joseph Hotz house at 454 E. Vandalia in Edwardsville and opened it as a tourist home. Two years later, Cathcart built a modest hamburger stand next door at 456 E. Vandalia. As business grew, he expanded the building to include a large restaurant and grocery.

Cathcart’s Café became a popular stop along Route 66. The café building no longer exists, but the house just west of it that most recently housed the Galleria Hearth and Home, has been beautifully preserved. The Cathcarts later built tourist cabins next door to the house, some of which still exist. In the early 1930s the Cathcart Tourist Home and Cabins were sold to the Goddard family who rented rooms to Route 66 travelers for many years.

Cathcart was important to Edwardsville’s story of Route 66 not only because of his businesses, but because he led a successful fight in 1938 against state plans to move Route 66 away from Edwardsville’s business district.

 

Route 66 Festival

The 16th annual Edwardsville Route 66 Festival will kick off on June 6 with a sock hop and continue on Friday night and Saturday, June 7 and 8, with events in City Park. Classic cars, music, great food and family fun have proved to be a winning combination for the festival. The event is drawing people from an ever widening geographic circle of Route 66 fans. A full schedule of events will be published closer to the dates of the event visit www.edwardsvilleroute66.com.

 

New Route 66 Heritage Posters

Members of HPC along with designer Sherrie Hickman of Creative Options Graphic Design are creating posters reflecting the history of ten different Edwardsville buildings along Route 66 (now Route 157). The posters will be on display at the Route 66 Festival and in the store front windows of businesses interested in promoting their Route 66 history. A bright blue Route 66 shield will draw visitors to the buildings.

 

Writing About Route 66 in Edwardsville

Local author and historian Cheryl Eichar Jett has been spreading the word about Edwardsville’s Route 66 story through articles in regional Route 66 publications. During the past year she has written “Along Route 66,” a monthly column in the Prairieland Buzz covering Route 66 in Montgomery, Macoupin and Madison counties, and written specifically about Edwardsville in magazines for the Illinois and Missouri Route 66 Associations. She is the author of two books on the old highway, “Route 66 in Madison County” and “Route 66 in Springfield.” Jett also authored the successful Illinois Route 66 Hall of Fame application for George Cathcart.

Until now, Edwardsville has not had a high profile in tourist publications describing historic Route 66. Fortunately, that situation is being remedied by folks with a love for America’s Mother Road and pride in Edwardsville’s heritage.

By Cindy Reinhardt – Intelligencer

Sep 112012
 




One of those shows I wish I could have made it to… Oh well, there is always NEXT year!!

Once a year, historic downtown Flagstaff’s narrow streets and redbrick buildings are alight with a unique kind of feeling. With 50s and 60s music blasting on street corners and smells wafting from vendors’ booths, people of various ages and descents crowd the streets and gaze at cars from all eras.

This was the atmosphere of the 8th Annual Route 66 Charity Car Show held this past weekend, organized by the Route 66 Car Club. With craft booths, food vendors and a maximum of 425 cars from the past and the present, there was something for everyone to gaze at. What was so unique about the event was the sense of community among showers, goers and sellers alike.

Route 66 Car Club, a non-profit organization, started in 1985 as club for Chevrolet Corvairs. The club’s interest expanded into other models and eras as the organization grew. Mark Strango, president of the Route 66 Car Club, is one of many who help run the car show. In the past six years, the show has raised about $150,000, $18,000 in the past year, which all went to local charities and the Flagstaff community. The club and show manage to do all this while also bringing business to the town. “[There is] an economic jolt to the economy every time we come up,” Strango said.

In the scope of history, cars and Route 66 have symbolized progress, travel, freedom and community. On the subject, Strango said, “My parents came out of WWII. At that time, you had the big expansion west. In WWII, not everybody owned a car. [Route] 66 was the first main road that went Midwest, starting into Chicago, and ending in Santa Monica, California. That’s how we migrated west. As a kid, I can remember riding in the car on Route 66. It’s the experience…It’s the love of the road; it’s beautiful. I can’t explain it any other way.”

Don Chacon, a Class of 1965 NAU alumnus and an educator for 45 years, was at the show on Saturday as an entrant, showing a classic car he fixed up and remodeled himself. Of the entrants, Chacon said, “You’re not going find a nicer group of people…we’re not here to raise chaos.” Lifting his cap to reveal gray hair, he added, “I mean, look how old we are.”

The car show strives to preserve the spirit of Route 66, small and yet so significant in the grand scheme of history. Strango said, “The main road is fading fast and we need to keep it alive for future generations. I’d like to see more of 66 get back on board – more of the states get together and make it a more continuous route…so people can experience it. [Otherwise,] our kids will never know.”

The show is an interesting, fun way to spend a day. It is a place for young people to learn and for others to relive the past. Walking down the streets, one can hear conversations in different languages, like Japanese and German, all brought together by a common interest in history represented through vehicles. Although a tourist area, Flagstaff is still an intimate community because local organizations, like the Route 66 Car Club, seek to benefit the town.

By Alexis Burnett – Northern Arizona News

Sep 052012
 


Second year in a row I will have to miss this car show, and trust me – I am not sleeping well because of it!!!



Route 66 has earned its place in American history, and the fabled Mother Road lives on in music, films, books and folklore. There may be no better way to celebrate that legacy than with a classic-car show and three-day bash.

FLAGSTAFF ROUTE 66 DAYS
When: Friday-Sunday, Sept. 7-9. Car show is 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday.
Where: 211 W. Aspen Ave.
Admission: Free. Registration is sold out.
Details: 928-451-1204, rt66johnny@gmail.com.

The eighth annual Flagstaff Route 66 Days, sponsored by the Route 66 Car Club of Flagstaff, takes place this weekend in the cool pines. More than 425 vehicles are registered for this year’s show, the seventh sellout in a row.

“We have all years, makes and models of cars, trucks, sports cars, muscle cars, street rods and special-interest vehicles entered in the show,” said John Fajardo, the club’s vice president.
The club is a non-profit, and all event proceeds will benefit local charities. “We have donated over $145,000 back to the community in our first seven years,” he said.

Some of the vehicles in the show are a restored 1913 Ford Model-T touring car; a hand-built 1916 Ford Model-T milk truck powered by a supercharged Chevrolet engine; and a 2002 Sterling diesel tractor.

“We have several large (Arizona) car clubs that come annually to the show, a gentleman comes each year from Michigan, and this year he’s bringing a 1932 Ford roadster powered by a late-model Corvette engine,” Fajardo said. “(Also) this year, we have a gentleman that’s driving his 1968 Mustang fastback from Minnesota.”

David Krippner of Casa Grande entered his daily driver: a custom 1936 Ford pickup built on a Dodge Dakota four-wheel-drive chassis. It’s white with tan flames, and the tweed interior matches the paint.

“The show is just a unique experience, and you get to spend all day downtown,” Krippner said. “And I like the little restaurants and microbreweries.”

Bob Hammons of Cornville entered his 1957 Bel-Air two-door hardtop, which he has owned for more than 45 years. Although his red Chevy seems to be original from the outside, a new Chevy ZZ 350 engine powers it.

“It’s such a nice, relaxed and well-run show, in a great setting, and everyone seems to have a great time,” Hammons said.

New to the event is the evening cruise-in 6-9 p.m. Friday at Freddy’s Frozen Custard and Steakburgers. It will feature music and top five choice awards for best vehicles.

The show also will feature arts-and-craft, food and automotive-memorabilia vendors. The women of the car club put together a 50/50 drawing and a raffle for gift baskets, and a silent auction will feature various items, including rare Native American jewelry.
The club will hand out more than 90 awards, including for best paint, engine and interior, best Ford, best Chevy and best Mopar. A “sensational six” best of show will receive trophies and cash prizes.

Route 66 Car Club members don’t enter their rides in the show, but they’ll display their vehicles in the city-hall parking lot from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, along with vendors and a farmers market. “Our club is very proud of the fact that the event has become so popular that each of our 425 car-show spaces sold out more than six weeks before the event,” Fajardo said.

by Nick Gallup –  The Republic | azcentral.com

Aug 262012
 

 



I find the article interesting only because while they are stating the rendezvous WILL take place – BUT they are still asking for donations. Also, I feel if this years event fails – it might be the last time this takes place….

The 23rd Annual Stater Bros. Route 66 Rendezvous is taking place in downtown San Bernardino from Sept. 13-16. That is a fact. And, in an effort to provide some background information and clear up any misconceptions, here are more facts regarding the San Bernardino Convention & Visitors Bureau and the Route 66 Rendezvous.

The Stater Bros. Route 66 Rendezvous is solely owned and operated by the San Bernardino Convention & Visitors Bureau, a non-profit 501c(6) corporation, with major support from our partnerships with the city of San Bernardino, the county of San Bernardino and our event sponsors, particularly our title sponsor, Stater Bros. Markets. The first Rendezvous was held in 1990 in Devore with the collaboration from the Over the Hill Gang. The event has grown each year and now attracts over 500,000 spectators during the four-day extravaganza.

Established in 1989, the San Bernardino Convention & Visitors Bureau’s main mission is to serve as the marketing arm of the city by promoting travel and tourism opportunities.

Initial funding for the San Bernardino Convention & Visitors Bureau was provided by a Memorandum of Understanding with the city of San Bernardino, whereby the SBCVB would receive 20 percent of the TLT (Transient Lodging Tax) collected by the city. As the economy became depressed, over the years that percentage has decreased and for the past three years the majority of our funding came through the Economic Development Agency.

In order to produce the annual Stater Bros. Route 66 Rendezvous all of the funds received from our sponsors, vendors, and car participants are used to pay the costs of the event, with an annual shortfall covered by the SBCVB. With the elimination of the Economic Development Agency and the subsequent loss of funding, coupled with the city’s current fiscal situation, there are no longer any funds available to subsidize any future losses on the Rendezvous.

While the 2012 Stater Bros. Route 66 Rendezvous will take place in downtown San Bernardino this September, we are asking for the support of local businesses and individuals to help us cover the loss of funding and in-kind support from the city, as well as to help us continue to move forward in planning for next year’s Rendezvous.

Donations made will be allocated exclusively for the operational expenses of keeping the Route 66 Rendezvous in downtown San Bernardino.

Donations can be made on the www.route-66.org website by clicking on the different dollar amounts ranging from $10 to $250, making the donor a “Friend of the Rendezvous” as bronze, silver, gold, super or ultimate cruiser. There is also an account set up at the 1st Valley Credit Union, 401 W. Second St., San Bernardino, CA 92401.

Or, businesses can become “Business Friends of the Rendezvous.” For a $2,500 or $1,500 donation, businesses will receive a large banner to display at their business, hundreds of billboard images on the large electronic sign on the 10 Freeway near the 215 Freeway junction and the San Manuel electronic billboard on the 215 Freeway near the Second Street exit.

Wayne Austin is president and CEO of the San Bernardino Convention & Visitors Bureau and wrote this article.

May 032011
 





The Kingman Air and Auto Show is returning after a four-year absence and is looking for sponsors and volunteers. The show is planned for Oct. 8-9 at the Kingman Airport and Industrial Park on Route 66.

The organization plans to have at least 20 planes, with around 10 giving rides, said Air Show President Andrew Raynor. Unfortunately, there will be no drag races this year. However, there will be a car show with plenty of vintage cars, racing vehicles, off-road vehicles and more. Tickets for the show will be available online at www.kingmanairshow.com starting May 1.

The organization hasn’t been able to hold a show since 2007 because of the economy. Sponsors simply didn’t have the funds to support the project, Raynor said. The organization has reworked its budget and some of the acts that it hired this year, trying to get more bang for its buck, while still providing a show for spectators.

“We’re trying to broaden things out a bit,” Raynor said.

However, they need vendors, sponsors and volunteers to help with the crowds. People interested in renting a space for their business, becoming a sponsor or volunteering for the show should call (928) 377-7260.

Suzanne Adams – Daily Miner Staff Reporter