Sep 052012
 


Second year in a row I will have to miss this car show, and trust me – I am not sleeping well because of it!!!



Route 66 has earned its place in American history, and the fabled Mother Road lives on in music, films, books and folklore. There may be no better way to celebrate that legacy than with a classic-car show and three-day bash.

FLAGSTAFF ROUTE 66 DAYS
When: Friday-Sunday, Sept. 7-9. Car show is 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday.
Where: 211 W. Aspen Ave.
Admission: Free. Registration is sold out.
Details: 928-451-1204, rt66johnny@gmail.com.

The eighth annual Flagstaff Route 66 Days, sponsored by the Route 66 Car Club of Flagstaff, takes place this weekend in the cool pines. More than 425 vehicles are registered for this year’s show, the seventh sellout in a row.

“We have all years, makes and models of cars, trucks, sports cars, muscle cars, street rods and special-interest vehicles entered in the show,” said John Fajardo, the club’s vice president.
The club is a non-profit, and all event proceeds will benefit local charities. “We have donated over $145,000 back to the community in our first seven years,” he said.

Some of the vehicles in the show are a restored 1913 Ford Model-T touring car; a hand-built 1916 Ford Model-T milk truck powered by a supercharged Chevrolet engine; and a 2002 Sterling diesel tractor.

“We have several large (Arizona) car clubs that come annually to the show, a gentleman comes each year from Michigan, and this year he’s bringing a 1932 Ford roadster powered by a late-model Corvette engine,” Fajardo said. “(Also) this year, we have a gentleman that’s driving his 1968 Mustang fastback from Minnesota.”

David Krippner of Casa Grande entered his daily driver: a custom 1936 Ford pickup built on a Dodge Dakota four-wheel-drive chassis. It’s white with tan flames, and the tweed interior matches the paint.

“The show is just a unique experience, and you get to spend all day downtown,” Krippner said. “And I like the little restaurants and microbreweries.”

Bob Hammons of Cornville entered his 1957 Bel-Air two-door hardtop, which he has owned for more than 45 years. Although his red Chevy seems to be original from the outside, a new Chevy ZZ 350 engine powers it.

“It’s such a nice, relaxed and well-run show, in a great setting, and everyone seems to have a great time,” Hammons said.

New to the event is the evening cruise-in 6-9 p.m. Friday at Freddy’s Frozen Custard and Steakburgers. It will feature music and top five choice awards for best vehicles.

The show also will feature arts-and-craft, food and automotive-memorabilia vendors. The women of the car club put together a 50/50 drawing and a raffle for gift baskets, and a silent auction will feature various items, including rare Native American jewelry.
The club will hand out more than 90 awards, including for best paint, engine and interior, best Ford, best Chevy and best Mopar. A “sensational six” best of show will receive trophies and cash prizes.

Route 66 Car Club members don’t enter their rides in the show, but they’ll display their vehicles in the city-hall parking lot from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, along with vendors and a farmers market. “Our club is very proud of the fact that the event has become so popular that each of our 425 car-show spaces sold out more than six weeks before the event,” Fajardo said.

by Nick Gallup –  The Republic | azcentral.com

Sep 032012
 


Friday – Juliana and I were able to ‘sneak away’ a little early and hit some of the places on the western half or Route 66 in Arizona








Seligman Sundries – Seligman AZ

Frank and I have ‘known’ each other via Eamil and FB, but I thought it was time I stopped in and said ‘hi’ and checked the place out. I was surprised by the size of it, I was also glad how freindly Frank & Lynne were. We got to talking about a whole bunch o’ stuff happening in the world today with an English couple driving the route as well as other ‘side trips’ along the way. About 45 minutes later – we were well on our way of being ‘late’ to our destination… I will keep Frank in my Rolodex as he is a man who is in the know – and we both found out we live in Scottsdale together (he and Lynne live down here in the winter)…

Click HERE for their website.



Frontier Motel & Restaurant – Truxton AZ

This was the reason for heading north. I wanted to get out here while it was still daylight nad take a look at the sign. You know, you never realize how big it is unless you are standing right in front of it. I will be honest – from earlier posts and pictures I have read/seen, I thought the sign was in better condition and needed a ‘touch up’. This would not be the case. I took a few pics and then was proceeded by being mauled by a big black dog (no, he just jumped on me). I followed him back into the office where I met Merline – Mildred’s daughter. I introduced myself and we started talking a bit. She mentioned she was working on getting the restaurant back up and running and it would take some time as her mother just passed. I asked her about the sign and asked if the neon worked – and she told me ‘I don’t know – the people who ran the restaurant were the last ones to light it.’ Then she mentioned the switch was in the restaurant – but we never made it that far. I gave her my card, she gave me hers and we departed from each other. The place needs work – a lot of it! It is a shame because it is really a stop most folks would probably like to stop, eat, and stay…..



Cruiser’s Cafe – Williams AZ

I made it a point to finally eat here. I wanted to see first hand what they did with the existing building. We decided to sit outside as there was a gent playing his guitar and keeping the crown entertained. One thing we did not expect was it was getting cool outside and we were not prepared for it (we are from Phoenix you know – where it was still 102 degrees out and in Williams, it was a balmy 75…) I had the pulled pork sandwich (messy but good) and she had the buffalo wings. After listening to the guy play and sing we decided to pay our bill and head down the road…

Click HERE for their website.

We ended up about a block or two down to stop and watch a ‘gun fight’ Williams has every night. It was fun to watch the tourist gather and appreciate all Williams has to offer…



Red Garter Inn – Williams AZ

We decided to stop in the Red Garter Inn as well seeing we keep going by it – and never stopped in. Juliana had a ‘sweet tooth’ going and they (ironically) sold chocolate chip cookies. So, while we waited on the cookie – we started looking around and then started talking to the girl behind the counter. She took about 25 minutes showing us around, showing us different pictures with the stories behind them and then she started talking about the (4) different rooms for rent and the stories behind them. They run for either $135 or $165 for a night – breakfast included with the price.

Click HERE for their website.




Pete’s Route 66 Gas Station Museum – Williams AZ

We then walked over to Pete’s Route 66 Gas Station Museum. I also wanted to finally check this place out because I heard so much about it. Little did I know – we would be there for over an hour! I met Neill (‘Pete’) and his buddy ‘Larry the Train Guy’ and we talked about everything Route 66. We found out we both knew many of the same folks and had a lot of the same stories. Neill talked about the gas station, buying it, restoring it, the visitors, the stories, and anything else that came up. Juliana spent most of her time talking to Larry – who we found out was one of the engineers on the Grand Canyon Railway, and Neill’s wife Ester came out and showed Juliana her flower bed.


We had to start heading out as it was getting late and we still had a 2 1/2 hour drive back to Scottsdale.

The whole purpose of this trip was to go and survey the Frontier Motel sign to see if it could possibly be my next project. BUT, it seems there are too many factors involved right now. The ‘new’ owner did not seem too excited about the idea (yes, I get the fact her mother died a month earlier…) the location is a little out of the way and the closest town(s) are Kingman and Seligman, and unlike the 66 Motel sign, I had everything I needed within 10 minutes from the sign. So it might have to wait a bit until I know what is happening with the motel and when I get a few more projects out of the way… Which there are two or three more I am looking at!!

Aug 312012
 



This article is from the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR – BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT and is one of many programs helping preserve and keeping Route 66 alive. The goal is to get ALL stretches of Route 66 in all eight states under this program!

Route 66 is America’s Mother Road. . . and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration’s $152,300 grant recently awarded to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) under the National Scenic Byways Program (NSBP) will fund the preparation of a corridor management plan (CMP) that ultimately may help preserve the history and nostalgia of the 153 miles of historic Route 66 within the BLM California Desert District that extends from Needles to Barstow, California.

Designated a national highway in 1926, U.S. Route 66 extends 2,448 miles across 8 states and 3 time zones from Chicago, IL to Santa Monica, California. The “Mother Road” essentially consists of connecting many existing roads, with some new road construction to complete a continuous route. The road was immortalized by Bobby Troupe’s song “Get Your Kicks On Route 66.

Upon completion of the CMP, the BLM will submit a nomination to the Secretary of the Department of Transportation for consideration to designate the California segment of Route 66 a National Scenic Byway. Currently portions of Route 66 in Arizona, Illinois, New Mexico, and Oklahoma have National Scenic Byway designation. The BLM worked closely with the California Historic Route 66 Association and California Preservation Foundation to develop the grant proposal.

The CMP also will provide travel information to domestic and international visitors about the intrinsic values of the history, culture, and natural landscapes, as well as recreational opportunities available along the corridor. The CMP will include a comprehensive interpretive, tourism and marketing strategy to enhance heritage tourism opportunities in an effort to promote and provide economic benefits to communities and local businesses.

“We have an incredible opportunity to work with stakeholders and communities along Route 66 to preserve and promote the history California’s portion of Route 66,” said Jim Kenna, BLM California State Director. “We want to inspire new generations of explorers who will revive the nostalgia and adventures of bygone days as they experience, learn about and care for our beloved Mother Road.”

The BLM will oversee preparation of the CMP and solicit extensive participation from local, county, state and federal stakeholders and partners to collaborate in the development of the CMP, including six Native American Tribes. NSBP funding supports projects that manage and protect these roads and improve visitor facilities. The California Legislature designated California Route 66 as “Historic Highway Route 66″ by statute in 1991.

For more information regarding the grant or the preparation of the Corridor Management Plan contact Danella George at (760) 808-5877.

Aug 222012
 





Get behind the scenes and help provide a unique experience!

Thousands of people around the world will train for months to get to the Williams Route 66 Marathon, presented by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma. However, without the help of approximately 1,500 volunteers, these individuals are unable to cross the starting line, much less the finish line.

Volunteers are particularly needed at packet pick-up, in the information tent, at Gatorade stops, relay stations and the finish line. Volunteers also play a key role along the course, where they make a lasting impression on the participants.

From humor to encouragement, every volunteer brings his or her own personality to the race. Each role is equally important – and rewarding. Volunteers at the Williams Route 66 Marathon return to assist year after year, making lifelong friends and creating moments that last forever.

Many corporations and organizations provide volunteers on an annual basis, using it as an opportunity to brand their company, express their corporate personality and demonstrate their local presence.

Volunteers receive special perks, including a goodie bag and a volunteer shirt. In addition, volunteers are invited to attend the Williams Route 66 Marathon Volunteer Thank You Party on Nov. 27.

Register today to join our efforts behind the scenes. For more information about our volunteer opportunities, contact our Volunteer Director, Amy Berry, at amy@route66marathon.com.

Click HERE to Volunteer

Aug 202012
 




The one thing about Seligman: it truly is a half day trip (at the least) to fully enjoy all which Seligman has to offer for Route 66 travelers.

SELIGMAN — The aromas of baking bread and sweet pies meander through the diner.

Through a wall of windows, diners can watch tourists gawk and gaze at the sights along the Mother Road, Route 66. Conversations by locals are of the weather and daily life. Conversations by tourists, often in languages other than English, speak to a mysterious excitement, the subject an enigma.

The matriarch of Route 66 Westside Lilo’s comes out of the kitchen. Lilo (pronounced Lee-Lo) Russell grabs a cup of coffee and takes a seat. She has been baking.

“It’s in my blood,” she says of her decision to be a diner owner.

Welcome to a day in her life.

MARRIED A SOLDIER

Her grandmother in Germany was a chef, and Russell came to Seligman for a visit in 1962 with her new husband Patrick. The had married in 1961 while Patrick was stationed in Germany during a hitch with the U.S. Army.

“We came by for me to meet (Patrick’s parents) and got stuck here,” she said, laughing.

That was 50 years ago. When the diner went up for sale 17 years ago, she bought it.

“And I’ve been in business ever since,” she says.

In the beginning of the business, she was focused on making it work and spent long days at the diner. She would come in at 5 a.m.

“But I’m too old for that, so I do all the things in the back of the house,” she says, adding that her daughter Brenda is the one who comes in at 5 a.m.

Now, she comes in early, bakes the pies, the cakes (especially the carrott cake) and the dinner rolls. She also works on the daily specials — particularly the German dishes like goulash, sauerbraten and schnitzel. She’s usually done by 3 or 4 p.m.

“If I’m lucky,” she says.

She adds that she enjoys the customers the most — not just the regulars, who keep the business going during the colder months, but the visitors who come for Route 66. Compliments about her food keep her going.

“That’s really what it’s all about,” Russell says. “Bottom line.”

FINDING GOOD STAFF KEY

In the winter months, 80 percent of her customers are locals. In the summer, the same percentage are tourists. The biggest challenge to keep a diner in a small town going is finding good staff and keeping the place warm and friendly for customers to feel comfortable.

Photos of her parents adorn a wall in the diner, and she admits that she still misses Germany. She says she tries to go back once a year.

Besides, Seligman and the restaurant are host to a German Fest in June, and she’s already making preparations for the 2013 festival.

Would she have done anything differently?

“I wouldn’t,” she says, definitively. She has a beautiful home, three children, seven grandchildren and even a great-grandchild. She volunteers for nonprofit health services and has a fulfilling life in the little town that refuses to die.

Will she stay?

“Oh, yeah,” she says, smiling. “After 50 years? I wouldn’t even consider moving. I enjoy going away, but I always want to come back. My life is here, really.”

If she would have been asked that question in 1964, the answer might have been different.

“But not now,” she says.

At 71, she’s not going to retire anytime soon.

“The best thing for me would be to keel over back there,” she says, pointing to the kitchen.

For more information about the restaurant, visit www.westsidelilos.com

LARRY HENDRICKS – azdailysun.com

Aug 192012
 




 

OK – I have done several projects on the route, including Illinois, New Mexico, and California. I live and work and enjoy Arizona, so I think it is time I ‘keep it close to home’ for my next project.

I actually have (4) in AZ I have my hands in:
The first is an old Richfield Gas Station in Winslow.
The second is the famous Meteor City Trading Post.
The third is a historic sign for a restaurant / motel located on Route 66, in Arizona.
The fourth is, well, a gas station in Tucumcari NM – so I guess that one really wouldn’t count!!

Richfield Gas Station – Winslow AZ

This is an interesting project for me. For the past year, I actually tried to BUY this gas station for my own and restore it back to it’s former glory, and then (one day) maybe lease it out as a gift shop or a little sandwich place for tourists. This would have been one of the ONLY restored Richfield Gas Stations on the route, and it would have been a gem! While going back and forth with it’s current owner (mind you, for almost a year!) I was doing massive research on all things Richfield. This included researching what the building looked like when it first opened, finding old photos, and figuring out what brands this station would have carried (this way I could have figured out which signs to put on the exterior of the building). So it was getting down to the wire and the owner decided to keep it! I was blown away! I felt if I lost one of my children at the mall for a minute as I tried to get everything ready to be a ‘proud owner of American history’ – but alas, it was not meant to be.
I sucked it up and through a few emails we continued to talk and one day, he told me his plans with the building, to ‘bring it back to the way it looked like in the 30’s and possibly run a business out of it’… Now mind you, I NEVER told him my plans – as far as he was concerned – I was just ‘some guy’ who wanted to buy the old building – nothing more. It felt like a weight was lifted off my chest as I knew someone had the same plans I did for the building. With that, I met up with him and downloaded ALL my research to his hard drive as a ‘helping hand’ on how to guide him to preserving this gas station.
Now, I am willing to offer to help him – as long as he will let me…


Meteor City Trading Post – Meteor City AZ

This one came to me via a converstation with Roger Naylor – co-author of ‘Arizona Kicks on Route 66’ – while on a phone call one day.
We were talking about preservation work and how he thought it would be ‘great’ to partake in a project –  as he did not know or want to ‘spearhead’ one, but he was more than willing to lend a helping hand.
We were talking about different sites on Route 66 in Arizona and he mentioned he spoke to the owners of the trading post and they were wanting to repaint their ‘World’s Longest Route 66 Map’ as the elements have taken a toll on it. I told him I would stop in on my (many) trips back and forth to Holbrook and see what they are looking to do. Well, I did as promised and found the owner of the trading post, and she pretty much did not want to believe some ‘stranger’ stops in offering a ‘friendly helping hand’ and help them fix something which tens of thousands of travelers stop and look at. As we went outside to tour the map, she was pointing out the damage done by the winds (note: the wind gusts get up to 40-60MPH in the open desert, and when you have something that big sitting there unprotected, it takes a beating). We talked about it being painted some time ago with the direction of Hampton Inns – but she said it was time for to repair the wood and repaint the map. As we walked around the property, she mentioned to me they still had the ORIGINAL trading post building, built in 1932(ish) and it was covered up by fencing. She then mentioned ‘everyone knows it is here and wants to see it and take pictures, but we do not know how to open it up to the public.’ So the lightbuld goes off. I told her to close up the front window and make sure the front door is secure and then remove and realign the wood fencing to INCLUDE the front of the historic original trading post. She loved the idea! Then out of the corner of my eye, I see two painting on the fence and ask her about them. She said ‘oh, Bob Waldmire painted those…’ Naturally, I replied “who knows that?!? Why isn’t there a sign or plaque letting the travelers know this?!?”
So there seems to be THREE projects at this site, all which are just as valuable as the next.


Historic Motel/Restaurant sign – somewhere on Route 66 in AZ

This one we all know and love BUT I need to check with the current owner to see what his/her plans are. He/she might already be working on something as I have seen work done on a portion of it, but the entire sign needs to be redone to show off its grandeur!
This one I will have to get back to you on, but I would LOVE to have the opportunity to work on this one!


Gas Station #10 – Tucumcari NM
OK, this one isn’t in Arizona and this one is pretty much planned with or without me there, but I figured if the timing was right, it is the least I can do to not only help out Tucumcari (again) but to help Mr. Rich Talley for his (several) trips to Needles to criticize me (I mean) help me with not only the 66 Motel sign restoration, but being there with the TEXACO and UNION gas stations before we went to Victorville for the fest.

I believe this should be enough to last me the rest of the year! Although in high country (northern Arizona) it does snow and get really cold, and all of these seem to be on the same ‘belt line’ – I might have to pick only two or three at the most – leaving one or so until next year…

Let me know what you think…

Aug 172012
 


Illuminated, colorful signs for iconic businesses tell Route 66 story best

Editor’s note: Explore Arizona contributor Roger Naylor and photographer Larry Lindahl traveled the length of Historic Route 66 in Arizona to document it in their 2012 book, “Arizona Kicks on Route 66.” In seeking to excerpt the book, we might have settled on the small-town history, the people or the kitschy-cool vibe. But the bright neon photos leaped off the pages. Here’s an armchair tour.

One of my favorite parts of writing “Arizona Kicks on Route 66” was discovering the kaleidoscope blaze of neon that still slices through small-town twilight. From Holbrook to Kingman, from Winslow to Williams, neon-sign language is the lingo of Route 66.

Route 66 neon signs

Neon shimmers and glimmers, it reinvents the dusk and changes the direction of color. Neon is the nightlight of angels and drunkards. Keep your starry, starry skies; give me one twinkling with rainbow hues. If I ever enter politics, the first law I’ll champion will be a tax break for every business that erects a neon sign.

Neon — both old and new — is still in evidence along Arizona’s portion of Route 66. That wavy ribbon of two-lane pavement carves out the journey of a lifetime. Grand adventures mingled with intimate moments unfold, while conjuring images of simpler times. In places where diners are still run by sassy waitresses who call everybody “Hon,” and motel rooms are shaped like tepees, neon signs paint the night softly.

Here are photographer Larry Lindahl’s images of Route 66 neon.

Dairy Queen

This dollop of vintage neon blends in perfectly in Holbrook, where the skyline includes cafes, a historic courthouse, hulking dinosaurs guarding rock shops and motel rooms shaped like wigwams. Not to mention the only Route 66 movie theater left in Arizona. Now, who wants ice cream?

Joe and Aggie’s Café

Sitting at the booth under the “Open” sign at Joe and Aggie’s on a summer evening, it’s easy to lose track of the decades. Folks stroll past on the sidewalk, cars glide through downtown Holbrook, and it’s all bathed in a neon glow. You’re just a snap-brim fedora and a few swooping Chevy fins from 1957.

Museum Club

If the term roadhouse didn’t exist, it would be coined for the Museum Club, a Flagstaff icon. The giant log cabin once housed a taxidermist, then a museum, before becoming a legendary music venue. It’s said to be haunted by the former owners, both of whom died in the club.

Galaxy Diner

Photos and memorabilia line the walls of the Galaxy Diner in Flagstaff. The aroma of chopped-steak burgers wafts through the joint, and banana splits are piled high. Every weekend brings live bands, swing-dancing lessons and car-club meetings.

Western Hills Motel

Neon and Route 66 will be forever linked. Garish, gaudy signs like this beauty in Flagstaff cut through the cacophony of roadside advertising to snag passing motorists. The motel may be a little down at the heels, but is still in operation.

Sierra Vista Motel

The Sierra Vista is a remnant of another era. A cluster of hotels and boarding houses once huddled along a pre-1935 alignment of Route 66 just south of downtown Flagstaff. Now, businesses such as Mother Road Brewing Co. and Pizzicletta restaurant are springing up along this stretch.

Cruiser’s Route 66 Cafe

Cruiser’s Cafe is the unofficial patio of Route 66, right on the Mother Road in downtown Williams. Ribs are almost always sizzling on the grill, and a guy with a guitar plays the soundtrack of a rambling youth. Traffic flows past, and it’s hard to resist ordering one more beer under those circumstances.

Rod’s Steak House

If you build it, they will come. If you build it and put a neon cow on the roof, they’ll stop for a meal. That bovine beacon has been luring hungry travelers to Rod’s Steak House in Williams since 1946.

Snow Cap

The Snow Cap in Seligman is beloved for its tasty grub and the wacky gags of the late Juan Delgadillo. Juan’s legacy lives on as his kids continue delivering his zingers along with juicy burgers. A visit to the Snow Cap is a reminder that life is delicious and should never be taken too seriously.

Supai Motel

Classic neon signs define the Seligman skyline, like the one at the Supai Motel. Pull into town at dusk with those lights beckoning and the seductive promise of New Color TVs, and it’s almost impossible not to stop for the night.

Historic Route 66 Motel

Route 66 pilgrims from all over the world visit Seligman because this is where the preservation movement began. They explore the small town with wide-eyed wonder during the day, then settle in at the Historic Route 66 Motel for the night.

Hill Top Motel

The sign lets you know you’re in for a classic Route 66 experience. The Hill Top in Kingman is an excellent example of the midcentury motor courts that are synonymous with the Mother Road. Enjoy a restful night on a high perch, away from the rumble of trains.

Route 66 facts

Arizona contains the longest unbroken stretch of Route 66 still in existence, 158 miles from west of Ash Fork to the California state line.

Arizona is the birthplace of Historic Route 66. Through the work of a handful of Seligman residents, Arizona became the first state to dedicate a stretch of U.S. 66 as Historic Route 66, thus beginning the preservation efforts that soon encompassed the entire road.

The only national park that Route 66 passes through is Petrified Forest National Park.

In 2009, Historic Route 66 in Arizona was designated an All-American Road under the Federal Highways National Scenic Byways Program. Only 31 roads in the nation have that distinction, and it is the only portion of Route 66 to hold it.

Details: www.arizonakicks66.com, Facebook.com/Route66Arizona, @Rt66Arizona on Twitter.

by Roger Naylor –  The Republic

 

Jul 302012
 


I had the honor of being interviewed about Route 66 and the preservation work I do on the route.

I was asked to come into the studios of KPHO – CBS 5 Morning News Show here in Phoenix to talk about Route 66 and the preservation effort currently going on.

I met Paul Horton, the host, and the Arizona Governors Conference on Tourism a few weeks ago and he simply said to me after the conference ‘you have to come on our program’. He followed up and came through!

I did not know the questions going in, I did not really know the pictures and video they were going to show, but he updated me a few things which would be discussed before the cameras rolled.

It is the fastest 3 minutes of my life, especially when you are in from of the camera!

The only regret is I did not mention Needles CA by name for the 66 Motel sign and the two gas station currently being restored.

Who knows, maybe I will have another opportunity?? ; )

Click HERE to watch the video.

Jul 152012
 




A new photo book out from two guys who know, and care about Route 66!

I have a little different connection with this book than most. I found the photography in this book of Route 66 in Arizona to be so crisp, clear and compelling I just had to use the pictures in my presentation at the 2012 Arizona Governors Conference of Tourism.

Not only did these pictures jump out on the ‘big screens’ when I gave my presentation – they really jump out at you in the book!

I have known Roger Naylor for a little while know – and we talk about our travels and upcoming potential projects on the route. He would tell me what ‘he heard was going on – on Route 66 in Arizona’ and I would share with him my stories and knowledge. The real opportunity to bond with him and Larry Lindahl was when I was approached to do the conference. Roger gave me a preview of his and Larry’s new book and I told him ‘I HAVE to use your images!

Then I contacted Larry – who I have NEVER spoken to before. After a few Emails, the deal was set and we were working together. The pictures are FANTASTIC.

Now, to the book! I had to buy this book! It is so clean and flows so well and it is so lively. Larry has taken pictures of all the places we know and love, and the short descriptions ond facts from Roger really compliment the book. It is a must have if you are looking for an addition to your collection!

I will say this – it is not a history book of Route 66 in Arizona, but it is nothing short of a modern day tour guide of Route 66 in Arizona!

While several places are not in the book, I think it balances out quite well, and who knows – maybe a SECOND Arizona Kicks on Route 66 would fill that gap?!?!?

You can order it online at Amazon buy clicking the link below:

Apr 202012
 



Phase 2 begins on the sign!

On our trip from Holbrook to Needles (I say OUR because I am traveling with Rich Talley, Motel Safari – Tucumcari fame). We decided to hit a few places on the way to Needles.

Now, on the way BACK to Flagstaff, we will be driving most of the route to stop at a bunch of places….

Until then, here are a few places we stopped at:

We met at the Globetrotter Motel and headed out to Flagstaff.
In Flagstaff, it was MANDATORY we stop at the Mother Road Brewering Company.

This is a new business on Route 66 and Rich really wanted to stop here, and we are glad we did!
It was 2pm and although they did not open until 3pm, they let us in and gave us a tour, and even better, a sampling of beer!

These folks are passionate about what they do and I feel they will be a great addition to Route 66. They are distributing in Arizona, but are looking for distributors all along the route.

After buying a 6 pack, we headed out.




























We then headed out to Kingman and decided to stop and eat at Mr. D’s. I had about 8 glasses of their Root Beer and a burger. I was not disappointed.
















We will spend all day getting the sign looking like it should and I will post the updates as well as our trip back to Flagstaff.