Aug 052013
 




Kingman residents and businesses have a year to dust off their saddle shoes, glam up their retro rides and spruce up their storefronts before putting out the welcome mat for the Route 66 Alliance’s annual Route 66 International Festival.

“It’s an opportunity to showcase Kingman as more than just a stop on Route 66,” said Mother Road historian Jim Hinckley. “It is an opportunity to come together as a community and say with pride, ‘Welcome to our town.'”

The Alliance announced that Kingman was the winner of next year’s Route 66 festival as this year’s festival in Joplin, Mo. wound down Saturday evening. The annual event brings approximately 10,000 people to the event city.

Hinckley has been working with Josh Noble, the executive director of tourism for the Kingman Chamber of Commerce, and Steve Wagner from Re/Max on Hualapai Mountain Road for more than a year to bring the festival to Kingman.

“It started after I ran into Rick Freeland (one of the co-founders of the Route 66 Alliance) last year at the festival in Victorville, Calif.,” Hinckley said.

Freeland told him that the location of the 2013 festival was already set, but the Alliance would be more than happy to consider Kingman for the 2014 festival. When Hinckley returned to Kingman, he met with Wagner and Nobel about the idea.

“The trick was, we had to show that there was community support and involvement with the idea,” Hinckley said. “Wagner really picked up the ball and ran with that.”

While Hinckley and Nobel worked on ideas for events and contacted local artists, authors and car enthusiasts, Wagner collected more than 30 letters of support from area businesses.

And then they had to wait for word from the Alliance. The official approval came at this weekend’s festival in Joplin.

“We’ve already got a basic foundation for the festival. The theme is ‘Kingman – Crossroads of the Past & Future,” said Hinckley, who traveled Joplin this weekend.

The Kingman festival will run from Aug. 13-17 next year. It will include events at the Hualapai Mountain Resort; an exhibit of Route 66 authors, artists and collectors at the new events center in historic downtown Kingman; a film festival featuring movies that were filmed on Route 66, in Kingman or feature Andy Devine; a bowling tournament; a golf tournament; tours of Desert Diamond Distillery; activities in Hualapai Mountain Park; and car cruising at night.

Electric highway

It will also feature a special edition of Kingman’s Chillin’ on Beale car show with an exhibit of alternative energy vehicles. Hinckley and Wagner hope to get a very special guest for the display that night, a 1902 electric Studebaker owned by Don Robertson of Jerome, Ariz. The car still runs.

They also hope to install electric recharge stations along Route 66 for the festival and turn the historic highway into one of the first electric highways in the nation.

“We wanted to plan more things for people to do than they could do in one day,” Wagner said. “We wanted them to say, ‘There’s too much going on. I have to come back tomorrow.’ This is great exposure for Kingman.”

Hinckley echoed those words from Joplin.

“There are people here from as far away as Australia and Tasmania. They came here just for this festival,” he said. “The potential for Kingman is astounding.”

With all of that international and national attention focused on Kingman, it’s a great opportunity to sell Kingman as a great place to visit, and a wonderful place to start a business and raise a family, Wagner said.

“I see it as a catalyst for the transformation of Kingman,” Hinckley said. “If we can just ignite the passion for a sense of community.”

He pointed to Galena, Kan., which also sits on Route 66. The city’s economy picked up after it started marketing its connection to the historic highway, Hinckley said.

The city is home to the International Harvester truck that was the basis for the character Mater in the Disney movie “Cars.” People started moving to the area, sales tax revenues went up, new businesses started moving in, old businesses were revitalized and historic buildings were restored, he said. Kingman could do the same thing.

By Suzanne Adams-Ockrassa – Daily Miner

Jun 012013
 





I do hope they reopen the restaurant (and orange juice stand) one day in the near future as I know EVERYONE will want to stop and get a chance to experience this place….

On a day when Fontana was celebrating its 100th birthday, Joe Bono on Friday did just what his family has done for the last 77 years: He offered his hospitality to tourists traveling on Route 66.
Sitting along the parking lot of Bono’s Old Route 66 restaurant on Foothill Boulevard was something Glen Heitritter and Linda Swenson of Omaha, Neb., had not yet seen on their ride down the Mother Road.

They stopped to take a look at the Big Orange, a 7-foot-high stucco ball from which thirsty travelers could buy glasses of fresh orange juice before the age of the freeway.

After the couple posed for the requisite photo, Bono gave them a tour of his place.

An attorney and former deputy district attorney, Bono grew up at the rear of the property at the corner of Sultana Avenue. A neighbor suggested to his mother in 1936 that she ought to sell juice to travelers along Foothill, which at the time had plenty of vineyards but was short on any places to stop for refreshment.

“It was all you could drink for 10 cents,” he told me in an interview some time ago.

That evolved into an Italian market and ultimately a restaurant. Especially during the Great Depression, Mama Bono would hear lots of hard-luck stories from many weary, and penniless, travelers seeking a new life in California and often fed them for free.

For Heitritter and Swanson, the Big Orange proved the perfect Route 66 distraction.

In their striking red Pontiac GTO — naturally, a 1966 model — they have traveled what remains of Route 66 since picking it up first in Carthage, Mo.

Among the notable experiences they’ve had was spending a night in one of the storied Wigwam Motels — with rooms shaped like teepees — in Holbrook, Ariz. They had passed the Inland Empire’s Wigwam Motel on the western edge of San Bernardino a few moments before pulling into Bono’s parking lot.

Before leaving for the end of the road at Santa Monica Pier that afternoon, they viewed Bono’s restaurant and its array of photographs and mementoes.

On a wall is a picture of young Joe and his father working in the vineyards not far away.

“Everything you see out there was vineyards,” he told the visitors, pointing out the windows toward Foothill.

But now Bono has big plans for his landmark business.

Looking over architect’s drawings, Bono said the restaurant, whose front windows are just a few feet shy of the now-four-lane Foothill Boulevard, will be moved south back from the highway. This will accommodate widening of the street as well as the construction of a huge warehouse planned on the other side of Sultana.

He said he was confident that Bono’s restaurant would reopen in the near future, to accommodate Fontana’s next century and for future travelers seeking the romance and adventure of Route 66.

By Joe Blackstock – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

May 062013
 




KINGMAN – Just call it The Gathering.

Roughly 10,000 people attend the Route 66 International Festival held each summer. Those disciples of the Mother Road – and their tourist dollars – could descend on the city en masse as Kingman is considered one of the favorites to host the event in 2014.

Such a gathering would have an undoubtedly positive affect on the city’s economy, but pulling off such a large-scale production will take teamwork by a number of public and private entities as well as residents.

Author Jim Hinckley and downtown Kingman booster Steve Wagner, both Route 66 and Kingman enthusiasts, seek volunteers to serve on committees that would work on specific aspects of the event, from drawing live bands, organizing car shows, food and beverage vendors and Route 66 beautification.

“It began almost 20 years ago in a rented tent in the faded wide spot in the road that is Landegrin, Texas,” said Hinckley of the International Festival now managed by the Route 66 Alliance.

A different community hosts the event each year.

Kingman is a front-runner to serve as the host city,” said Hinckley.

The men are banking on approval with the end game of pulling off a successful festival that highlights Kingman’s attraction as a destination.

If Kingman does land the hosting gig, the event would be held in conjunction with the August 2014 edition of Chillin’ on Beale Street, said Hinckley.

The initial plan, he said, calls for a Saturday car show, an exhibition of artists and authors in the Southwest whose work focuses on Route 66, a barbecue at Hualapai Mountain Park and live music.

The event, said Hinckley, “would introduce visitors to some of the community’s unique attractions, such as the Stetson Winery and the award-wining Desert Diamond Distillery.”

This August the festival is in Joplin, Mo. Last year it was in Victorville, Calif., and the year before that it was in Amarillo, Texas.

“We like to move it around,” said Rick Freeland of the Alliance.

Freeland confirmed Kingman is the front-runner, but an announcement won’t be made until Aug. 3, the final day of the Joplin festival.

“This will be great for Kingman,” said Freeland. “Every town or city that has hosted the event has seen a significant bump in the local economy. And this is a true international event. Route 66 truly does have a global following.”

Freeland said the Alliance’s primary goal is to double the number of cars that travel Route 66 between Los Angeles and Chicago.

If you’re interested in helping out, call Hinckley at (928) 530-7899 or Wagner at (928) 377-2239.

By Doug McMurdo – Daily Miner

Apr 242013
 





KINGMAN – Work is ramping up as four adjoining businesses along Route 66 – including the historic Hotel Brunswick – prepare to welcome customers this summer and fall.

The hotel and a potential restaurant within it are slated to open in September, and an ice cream parlor and bakery will be operating by the middle of June. The ice cream parlor, called Route 66 Ice Cream and Sweets, Inc., will be run by Brenda Marker, co-owner of B & G Accounting and Tax LLC in downtown Kingman.

Ed and Christina Silverman currently own the bakery, called Route 66 Bakery, and operate it out of their home. A restaurant for the hotel has not been determined yet, and developer Werner Fleischmann is searching for a tenant who will provide home-cooked, family-style meals.

Kingman really needs all this,” said Marker. “It needs entrepreneurs who are willing to spend the time and effort to bring this area back. They must have the vision to succeed here. It’s not about the money, because that doesn’t come until later.”

Fleischmann is currently remodeling the three-story hotel at 315 E. Andy Devine Ave and adding a restaurant in the 12,000 square foot building. Also, he is renovating the former 2,000 square foot Old Trails Garage at 311 E. Andy Devine Ave. for the ice cream parlor and full-service bakery.

Fleischmann has been coming to Kingman at least three times a year for the last 20 years.

In that time, he’s developed land, sold real estate, bought properties and rented them out. He owns commercial property at 432 Beale St. that houses three small businesses, and just bought the old J.C. Penney store at Fourth and Beale streets.

Hotel Brunswick was built in 1909 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Throughout the last century, the hotel has seen numerous owners come and go. It was closed between the late 1970s and late 1990s, and after it reopened in 1997, a handful of owners gave running the business their best shot. One after another, their attempts fell short, and the historic building’s doors have been closed since 2010.

“Werner is leaving everything as it was when the hotel was popular,” said Marker. “It will be an old-time hotel with a modern flair. This is going to be great for downtown Kingman and for Route 66.”

Marker said the hotel’s 30 rooms will be accessible to handicapped patrons, and an elevator is being installed in the building. Marker said the hotel will consist of Cowboy and Cowgirl rooms, each containing twin beds and a shared a central bathroom; Railroad rooms, with full beds and bathrooms between the suites; and two Cadillac suites behind the ice cream parlor and bakery, complete with queen beds and kitchenettes.

All rooms will have access to the courtyard, which will feature a garden and block wall.

Marker said Route 66 Ice Cream and Sweets Inc. will offer hand-dipped ice cream, including sugar-free and soy, in gluten-free cones. The business will sell shakes, floats, banana splits and sundaes, as well as old-fashioned candy. Marker said she will work with the bakery to use their brownies and other products in her creations.

The Silvermans, who sell their goodies at area stores and gas stations, are looking forward to creating an environment where customers can meet and share coffee and treats.

“Our business has dictated our need to move to a bigger location, and we want to serve the community better,” said Ed Silverman. “We appreciate the historic value of Kingman as a city and Route 66 being the heart of it and bringing everything together.”

“We’re excited, and believe the combination of ice cream and bakery goods will make this a sweet house.”

By Kim Steele – Daily Miner

Mar 042013
 





The very best thing one can do to support Route 66 is to travel it. Period.
A traveler can stop and visit restaurants, motels, gift shops and so on, and so on – and by purchasing items, meals, overnight rooms, this is the best way to make sure the route not only ‘stays open’ – but grows as well.

So, what if you can’t get out and travel the route (anytime soon at least)? Do what I do: Support the different Route 66 associations.

I have been (and still am for the most part) a ‘business member’ of most of the Route 66 State Associations. I believe in what they stand for on a smaller level as they concentrate only on their state, with once in a while crossing state lines to help a neighboring project on the route.

I am also a fan of any national Route 66 associations or alliances – but the state level is where I like to be. All in all: They all have their purpose.

I have created a link with all the different associations so you can check them out yourself. I enjoy getting all the news letters and info either mailed to me or even Emailed to me and I always try to help them any way I could.

The only ‘downer’ I have is I was surprised on how many folks who are sort of the ‘who’s who’ of the route do not support these associations – even if only in their own state the route runs through. There may be a slew of reasons and I do not want to name names, I just hope they will see the example so many other folks have become members to support the route in yet another way.
I believe those who are in the ‘know’ should always be a great example of how to do the right thing on the route by supporting it. Hopefully we can get a few more members on board!!

Route 66 Association of Illinois

Route 66 Association of Missouri

Kansas Historic Route 66 Association

Oklahoma Route 66 Association

Texas Route 66 Association(They do not have an active website)

New Mexico Route 66 Association

Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona

California Historic Route 66 Association

National Historic Route 66 Federation

Dec 292012
 





Another in a series of ‘guest articles’ written by folks from all over the world. If you would like to contribute – please send me an Email at info@route66world.com with your article and I just might post it!!

You’re a true road warrior. You don’t let little things like blizzards, freezing temperatures and slick highways keep you away from a cold-weather vacation. You also have a sense of the past and Americana, so taking historic Route 66 is on your itinerary.

Insurance

What also should be on your itinerary— getting insurance. Since winter carries its own unique set of challenges, carrying insurance for your trip will give you coverage in case of trip cancellation, travel delays, lost luggage and medical emergencies. Travel Guard has its own winter storm page, as well as a place to compare travel insurance quotes.

Clothing in Layers

Once you’ve decided that winter hazards are worth the trip, make plans to enjoy the sites along Route 66, which runs from Chicago to its terminus at the Pacific Ocean in Santa Monica (CA). Take a few tips from “Blue Coyote,” “Silly Squirrel” and “Cactus Killer,” travelers who chronicled their 2010 trip along Route 66 at the Dancing Weasel. They give plenty of trip tips, especially for those planning to go camping. (Examples: Dress in layers in mountainous areas, and bring sunscreen, no matter what season). Also provided is an interactive trip of the route. At one stop the travelers made along the way was Texola (OK), which they described as not quite a ghost town.

“We couldn’t help but get out and walk around, exploring what happens when a town is on the verge of extinction but still holding on,” their blog reported— they even heard a dog barking from a distance.

Road Conditions & Virtual Road Maps

It might be hard to get that type of experience while traveling on an interstate. RoadTrip America is a spoonful of information on a Route 66 trip. It includes a link to “Guy Randall’s Tour of the Mother Road,” for example, that includes 4,566 photographs, historical anecdotes and updated reports of road conditions. Open a state page to obtain a virtual road map, and then scroll down to the bottom of the page to get a map of that state.

From that page, you’ll open a new page that explains attractions on that section of the route. Use the navigation links for “Route 66 West” and “Route 66 East” at the top of this page or click on the next town shown on the map. Repeat the process when you reach a new state line to continue the trek.

Weather Conditions

To keep track of local weather, click on the Weatherblink.com link for local forecasts, which will come in handy in the unpredictable winter months.

Sleeping Conditions

Eventually, you want to find places to sleep. For a truly unique motel experience, stay at a Wigwam Motel in Holbrook (AZ), or San Bernardino (CA). The California motel has a village-style arrangement of 19 tepees, each 30 feet high and made from wood framing, concrete and stucco. Individual wigwams are equipped with all the traveler’s essentials that Natives probably didn’t have, such as an outdoor barbecue grill. There also is a kidney-shaped swimming pool at the motel.

Extra Tips

The National Historic Route 66 Federation gives some advice on planning a trip. After all, Route 66 isn’t on ordinary maps and there are few road signs to view it. The website store offers a Route 66 kit allowing travelers to plan a trip in advance, which is crammed with motels, cafes and trading posts.

And with winter being the off-season for Route 66 travelers, you won’t have to deal with many large crowds either.

By Dee Paulson – Dee is a retired world history teacher, Dee travels the world and shares cultural and political viewpoints in her stories online. She visits Cairo and Italy every year.

Nov 122012
 




This is our third guest article on Route 66. This one focuses on the ‘winter’ of, or ON, Route 66!

Traveling down the historic Route 66 is a unique way to get your family together during the Christmas holiday. Gather the troops from across the country and reconnect on the old historic “Mother Road” that, at one time, was best passageway from the Midwest to the West.


Drive through the streets of a fabulous world of kitschy Americana, follow each other in a caravan of cars or pile in an RV (try to avoid motorcycles during winter — it can get cold!). Each little town you pass has a legend attached to it. You may find yourself touring an old school house, visiting a nostalgic ice cream shop and looking over your shoulder in one of the many ghost towns along the tour. With the wind in your hair and not a worry in the world, this will be the best Christmas EVER!

Step into a history rich with roadside attractions, neon signs, rusty gas stations, 50s diners and vintage motels. It’s all part of the experience, part of the adventure. What do you need to know and where do you go?

Driving Tips

  • Be sure you have appropriate car insurance (with roadside assistance) so you are 100 percent protected and carefree on your journey.
  • Don’t advertise you are away from home. When in a city with inhabitants, keep your maps out of plain sight when stopped and use the truck stops if in need of rest — they are generally the safest place to rest your eyes.

Great Idea No. 1

Before you go on this fabulous family vacation, make a playlist of Christmas songs and old country driving tunes (Willy Nelson would be a great choice). Burn it to a few disks and bam! Christmas gifts, done! You’ll be singing all the way from Amarillo to Tucumcari. Pair that with the EZ66 Guide for sale at Route 66 World Bookstore and Roadfood and you’ll be on your way to worry free holidays.

Great Idea No. 2

Roadfood. It’s a must-get book. Ever wanted to eat at little off the beaten path at classic regional restaurants but don’t know how to find them? This book was written by a couple who went on a country-wide trip, finding and rating the best unknowns. While the directions are good, a navigational device is extremely helpful.

Fun Places to Stop

Christmastime along the Route 66 is vibrant with life and lights. It’s quirkiness illuminates with decorations aglow.

  • Chain of Rocks Bridge — Constructed in 1929, the bridge crosses the Mississippi from Alton, Ill. to St. Louis, Mo. and has a 30-degree turn midway across a mile-long bridge, according to nps.gov. Today, it has trails for walking and biking — fun for the whole family.
  • The Blue Whale — Sitting in Catoosa, Okla. is an 80-foot long smiling blue whale that Hugh Davis built for his whale-collecting wife, Zelta, as a gift. The attraction dates back to the 1970s.
  • Sandhills Curiosity Shop — Located in Erick, Okla., this wacky shop is full of music memorabilia. But it’s not just a shop, it’s an experience. Sit for awhile and have a chat with the owners, Harley and Annabelle Russell.
  • Restored Phillips 66 Gas Station – Between Clinton and Amarillo, Texas, this is where gas is 19 cents a gallon. That was all the way back in 1927, according to ridingroute66.us.
  • Cadillac Ranch — Amarillo, Texas has a mythical land covered with 10 historic Cadillacs, noses stuck in the earth as they erect from the land. You are free to graffiti your presence on the pieces of art, says legendsofamerica.com. They are open to the public to decorate.
  • Tucumcari, New Mexico – A pleasant reminder of the good old days. With historic motels like the Blue Swallow and Motel Safari, you can sleep under the pretty neon signs which light up the route through town.
  • Winslow, Ariz. — Simply, so you can stand on the corner in Winslow, Ariz. and live in the Eagles song, “Take it Easy.”
  • The Grand Canyon Railway’s Christmas Polar Express — In Williams, Ariz., a charming little town sits along the Route 66. During Christmas, the railway turns into a magical Christmas train to the North Pole.
  • Santa Monica Pier — Route 66 ends with an amusement park, an old carousel and the lovely California coast.

Lastly, be sure to take special care of our Route 66. Help preserve historic landmarks along the 2,400 -mile stretch. What can you do? Clean up after yourself and others, drive slow and enjoy the sites and get into the nostalgia by helping the local businesses survive.

Article by Olivia Lewin

Sep 112012
 





Was just notified the trading post was for sale on Route 66 in Arizona…
A note from the owner:

“Hi every one just wanted to let everyone know the Historic Meteor City Trading Post is for sale approx. 4+ acre site, a 500 foot geodesic building (trading post) and trailer home in back … trading post has been here since 1937 right on Route 66 – a diamond in the rough with a lot of potential. If intrested please message me”
Thanks
Joanna Estrada

The post has the famous ‘World’s Longest Map of Route 66’, the have the ‘World’s Largest Dream Catcher’, they have several original paintings done by the late Bob Waldmire, and they have the original Trading Post / Justice of the Peace building which was built in the 1930’s, which has been covered up by the wood fence on the west side of the current trading post.

The current trading post is not only iconic, it is photographed by travelers worldwide.

I was told the asking price is $150,000 and you can text Joanna on her cell: 928.386.9122

Sep 112012
 




One of those shows I wish I could have made it to… Oh well, there is always NEXT year!!

Once a year, historic downtown Flagstaff’s narrow streets and redbrick buildings are alight with a unique kind of feeling. With 50s and 60s music blasting on street corners and smells wafting from vendors’ booths, people of various ages and descents crowd the streets and gaze at cars from all eras.

This was the atmosphere of the 8th Annual Route 66 Charity Car Show held this past weekend, organized by the Route 66 Car Club. With craft booths, food vendors and a maximum of 425 cars from the past and the present, there was something for everyone to gaze at. What was so unique about the event was the sense of community among showers, goers and sellers alike.

Route 66 Car Club, a non-profit organization, started in 1985 as club for Chevrolet Corvairs. The club’s interest expanded into other models and eras as the organization grew. Mark Strango, president of the Route 66 Car Club, is one of many who help run the car show. In the past six years, the show has raised about $150,000, $18,000 in the past year, which all went to local charities and the Flagstaff community. The club and show manage to do all this while also bringing business to the town. “[There is] an economic jolt to the economy every time we come up,” Strango said.

In the scope of history, cars and Route 66 have symbolized progress, travel, freedom and community. On the subject, Strango said, “My parents came out of WWII. At that time, you had the big expansion west. In WWII, not everybody owned a car. [Route] 66 was the first main road that went Midwest, starting into Chicago, and ending in Santa Monica, California. That’s how we migrated west. As a kid, I can remember riding in the car on Route 66. It’s the experience…It’s the love of the road; it’s beautiful. I can’t explain it any other way.”

Don Chacon, a Class of 1965 NAU alumnus and an educator for 45 years, was at the show on Saturday as an entrant, showing a classic car he fixed up and remodeled himself. Of the entrants, Chacon said, “You’re not going find a nicer group of people…we’re not here to raise chaos.” Lifting his cap to reveal gray hair, he added, “I mean, look how old we are.”

The car show strives to preserve the spirit of Route 66, small and yet so significant in the grand scheme of history. Strango said, “The main road is fading fast and we need to keep it alive for future generations. I’d like to see more of 66 get back on board – more of the states get together and make it a more continuous route…so people can experience it. [Otherwise,] our kids will never know.”

The show is an interesting, fun way to spend a day. It is a place for young people to learn and for others to relive the past. Walking down the streets, one can hear conversations in different languages, like Japanese and German, all brought together by a common interest in history represented through vehicles. Although a tourist area, Flagstaff is still an intimate community because local organizations, like the Route 66 Car Club, seek to benefit the town.

By Alexis Burnett – Northern Arizona News

Sep 052012
 


Second year in a row I will have to miss this car show, and trust me – I am not sleeping well because of it!!!



Route 66 has earned its place in American history, and the fabled Mother Road lives on in music, films, books and folklore. There may be no better way to celebrate that legacy than with a classic-car show and three-day bash.

FLAGSTAFF ROUTE 66 DAYS
When: Friday-Sunday, Sept. 7-9. Car show is 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday.
Where: 211 W. Aspen Ave.
Admission: Free. Registration is sold out.
Details: 928-451-1204, rt66johnny@gmail.com.

The eighth annual Flagstaff Route 66 Days, sponsored by the Route 66 Car Club of Flagstaff, takes place this weekend in the cool pines. More than 425 vehicles are registered for this year’s show, the seventh sellout in a row.

“We have all years, makes and models of cars, trucks, sports cars, muscle cars, street rods and special-interest vehicles entered in the show,” said John Fajardo, the club’s vice president.
The club is a non-profit, and all event proceeds will benefit local charities. “We have donated over $145,000 back to the community in our first seven years,” he said.

Some of the vehicles in the show are a restored 1913 Ford Model-T touring car; a hand-built 1916 Ford Model-T milk truck powered by a supercharged Chevrolet engine; and a 2002 Sterling diesel tractor.

“We have several large (Arizona) car clubs that come annually to the show, a gentleman comes each year from Michigan, and this year he’s bringing a 1932 Ford roadster powered by a late-model Corvette engine,” Fajardo said. “(Also) this year, we have a gentleman that’s driving his 1968 Mustang fastback from Minnesota.”

David Krippner of Casa Grande entered his daily driver: a custom 1936 Ford pickup built on a Dodge Dakota four-wheel-drive chassis. It’s white with tan flames, and the tweed interior matches the paint.

“The show is just a unique experience, and you get to spend all day downtown,” Krippner said. “And I like the little restaurants and microbreweries.”

Bob Hammons of Cornville entered his 1957 Bel-Air two-door hardtop, which he has owned for more than 45 years. Although his red Chevy seems to be original from the outside, a new Chevy ZZ 350 engine powers it.

“It’s such a nice, relaxed and well-run show, in a great setting, and everyone seems to have a great time,” Hammons said.

New to the event is the evening cruise-in 6-9 p.m. Friday at Freddy’s Frozen Custard and Steakburgers. It will feature music and top five choice awards for best vehicles.

The show also will feature arts-and-craft, food and automotive-memorabilia vendors. The women of the car club put together a 50/50 drawing and a raffle for gift baskets, and a silent auction will feature various items, including rare Native American jewelry.
The club will hand out more than 90 awards, including for best paint, engine and interior, best Ford, best Chevy and best Mopar. A “sensational six” best of show will receive trophies and cash prizes.

Route 66 Car Club members don’t enter their rides in the show, but they’ll display their vehicles in the city-hall parking lot from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, along with vendors and a farmers market. “Our club is very proud of the fact that the event has become so popular that each of our 425 car-show spaces sold out more than six weeks before the event,” Fajardo said.

by Nick Gallup –  The Republic | azcentral.com