Mar 042013
 





The very best thing one can do to support Route 66 is to travel it. Period.
A traveler can stop and visit restaurants, motels, gift shops and so on, and so on – and by purchasing items, meals, overnight rooms, this is the best way to make sure the route not only ‘stays open’ – but grows as well.

So, what if you can’t get out and travel the route (anytime soon at least)? Do what I do: Support the different Route 66 associations.

I have been (and still am for the most part) a ‘business member’ of most of the Route 66 State Associations. I believe in what they stand for on a smaller level as they concentrate only on their state, with once in a while crossing state lines to help a neighboring project on the route.

I am also a fan of any national Route 66 associations or alliances – but the state level is where I like to be. All in all: They all have their purpose.

I have created a link with all the different associations so you can check them out yourself. I enjoy getting all the news letters and info either mailed to me or even Emailed to me and I always try to help them any way I could.

The only ‘downer’ I have is I was surprised on how many folks who are sort of the ‘who’s who’ of the route do not support these associations – even if only in their own state the route runs through. There may be a slew of reasons and I do not want to name names, I just hope they will see the example so many other folks have become members to support the route in yet another way.
I believe those who are in the ‘know’ should always be a great example of how to do the right thing on the route by supporting it. Hopefully we can get a few more members on board!!

Route 66 Association of Illinois

Route 66 Association of Missouri

Kansas Historic Route 66 Association

Oklahoma Route 66 Association

Texas Route 66 Association(They do not have an active website)

New Mexico Route 66 Association

Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona

California Historic Route 66 Association

National Historic Route 66 Federation

Jan 312011
 




On a recent trip into Needles CA – I was fortunate enough to meet the owners of the Route 66 Motel. The motel is no longer taking guests – as it is now used for monthly rentals. The owners told me they would rather have travelers stay – but with the economy the way it has been, they need to rely on the monthly rent their tenants give them.

They also mentioned the idea of trying to get a grant to ‘work on the exterior of the place’ was not too far fetched. If they decided to start taking travelers – then they would have to go back into the individual rooms and do a 100% remodel.

After talking to them further – we looked at the sign and the owner told me ‘I can’t tell you how many people stop and take pictures of that sign! If I had a dollar….’ It’s funny because most owners who have businesses on Route 66 and have a neat and interesting sign – all say the same thing!!

So, I offered them something they were not expecting. I told them we all know it is one of the most photographed signs on the route and I would be honored to repaint it and replace all the yellow bulbs on it – for free. I do this because I am hell-bent on preserving these historic places on Route 66.

I told them I cannot do the neon because we have to figure a way to make sure the ‘local kids’ stop throwing rocks at it and breaking the neon. I am working on a plan for that as well.

Ironically, they said they felt the sign is it’s own attraction and they really don’t need to use it as a connection with their business – but they see the importance and how much folks love it – and they were very welcome to the idea of me helping them preserve it.

So I will post some pics when I get back out there shortly – and hopefully I will do a decent and respectable job!!

Jan 252011
 



LINCOLN — 2011 looks to be another exciting year for Route 66 in Logan County. The Route 66 Heritage Foundation of Logan County is busy, along with the Abraham Lincoln Tourism Bureau of Logan County, in promoting Route 66 in grand style statewide.

The foundation hustled to finish up a National Park Service grant in 2010 that helped fund some major repairs at The Mill. Foundation repairs, windows and electrical service, along with a newly refurbished floor, was just some of the work done to help move The Mill one step closer to opening as a museum in 2011.

Local help, teamed up with many members of the Route 66 Association of Illinois, worked hard to meet the grant deadlines. The group continues to deal with the challenge of funding issues, but makes up for it with diligence and hard work aimed at seeing the Route 66 icon opened up as a museum that will house Route 66 history in Logan County. This extensive amount of work could not have occurred without also a generous grant from The Danner Trust and an extremely generous donation from local philanthropist Larry Van Bibber.

To continue its mission of restoring The Mill, the foundation once again will hold the Annual Route 66 Garage Sale. Without project manager Bruce Huskins, who stepped down after 2010’s event, the future of the sale was unknown. With careful consideration, Geoff Ladd, executive director of the Abraham Lincoln Tourism Bureau of Logan County, stepped up to manage the event that now is booked for May 13 and 14 with some changes in store. All proceeds from this countywide event will go toward The Mill restoration project.

Additionally, the Abraham Lincoln Tourism Bureau is pleased to announce the return of the Route 66 Association of Illinois Hall of Fame banquet on June 11, to be hosted at Lincoln College in the new Lincoln Center. This several-hundred member statewide organization will be celebrating Route 66 with a special tribute to the late famed Route 66 artist Bob Waldmire, as well as enjoying Lincoln and Logan County, a great location that includes a vast amount of Route 66 history along a 37-mile stretch of the Mother Road.

The Route 66 Heritage Foundation of Logan County was formed with the intention of bringing together community members who are passionate about Route 66 and its history in Logan County. It is a group that always is accepting new members and volunteers.

For details on these events or for information on how to get involved, call 217-732-8687.

Copyright 2011 Lincoln Courier. Some rights reserved

Jan 172011
 

FROM A PLAN to relight a towering theater sign and restore a nearby rare neon and opal design in Highland Park, California, to a project to repair and upgrade an iconic motel in Cuba, Missouri, the National Park Service, Route 66
Corridor Preservation Program
announces its 2010 annual cost-share grant awards. As in previous years, the number of cost-share grant requests exceeded available funding. The five new projects receiving grants are described in brief below. A full description of current and previous awards is available at www.cr.nps.gov/rt66.

The Historic Seligman Sundries, Seligman, Arizona
A cost-share grant will help pay for a new asphalt shingle roof, replicating how the building appeared during its Route 66 heyday.

Relighting the Historic Signs of Figueroa Street, Highland Park, California
This project will relight the Highland Theatre sign and restore to operating condition the former Manning’s Coffee Store sign down the street.

Munger Moss Motel, Lebanon, Missouri
A cost-share grant will assist the restoration of the Munger Moss’s landmark neon sign and a smaller “office” sign.

Wagon Wheel Motel, Cuba, Missouri
This project will purchase a HVAC system, install new storm windows, and repair rotted eaves and porch members.

Bristow Firestone Station, Bristow, Oklahoma
A cost-share grant will assist the full restoration and renovation of a former Firestone filling station for new use as a body
repair shop.

FOLLOWING THE SUCCESS of the first 50, the National Park Service’s Heritage Education Service added 50 more properties to the Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary for Route 66. The new entries include Meramec River Bridge, Red Cedar Inn, Palms Grill Café, Old Trails Bridge and others. The itinerary was produced by the NPS in partnership with the American Express and World Monuments Fund Sustainable Tourism Initiative and the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers. Take your trip down Route 66 here: http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/route66/.

Jan 162011
 

RANCHO CUCAMONGA – There were many reasons why Ed Dietl founded the Historical Preservation Association of Rancho Cucamonga in 2005.

But his main motive is to save the abandoned gas station on Foothill Boulevard west of Archibald Avenue, which in its heyday, served the migrants who left behind the Dust Bowl in hopes of a brighter future.

Dietl recently stood in front of the Mission-styled structure and weighed the future of the old gas station.

“I’m really kind of sad about it,” he said. “I sure would like to see this place saved.”

Dietl and many others invested in the preservation of Route 66 have been dealt a major blow. During the recent storms, the back building that once served as a service garage

Dietl, with the Historical Preservation Association, wants to preserve the old Cucamonga Service Station along Foothill Boulevard in Rancho Cucamonga as a possible Route 66 museum. But the property is owned by Lamar Advertising, which has requested permission from the city to demolish the rain-damaged structure. The sheet metal roof couldn’t hold the rainwater and collapsed.
“I’m really disappointed that this happened but I’m still excited about the opportunity to save it,” Dietl said.

The gas station, characterized by its signature square columns in front of the garage, was not damaged.

Planning Director James Troyer said with two walls of the service garage still standing, it’s possible to save the building.

The property is owned by Lamar Advertising, which also owns the two adjacent billboards at the intersection. The billboard company recently requested permission from the city to demolish the rain-damaged structure. The city is expected to make a decision this week.

Two years ago, the city gave the Cucamonga Service Station, also known as the Richfield Gas Station, historic landmark status. The move was opposed by Lamar Advertising because such a designation lowered the property’s value.

With the historic status in place, the property owner now must gain the city’s permission before tearing it down.

Dietl wants to buy the building. He wants the property and its neighboring lot on the west side be developed into a Route 66 attraction – with a local history museum, gift shop and a place where classic car enthusiasts can visit and have their pictures taken.

Through the years, Lamar Advertising has listed the price from as high as $600,000 to as low as $125,000, Dietl said. But the historical group doesn’t have the funds to purchase the property or fix up a structure that doesn’t have electricity or water.

Deputy City Manager Linda Daniels said the city is in negotiations with Lamar about acquiring the property.

“We’re interested in both the property and the building,” Daniels said.

These are shaky times for local fans of the nation’s famed highway.

Earlier this month, a Route 66 memorabilia store housed in an 110-year-old building, closed because of an unforgiving economy.

Jim Conkle, founder of the Route 66 Preservation Foundation, said Foothill Boulevard stalwarts Magic Lamp and Sycamore Inn are fine additions to the historic thoroughfare but aren’t enough to draw tourists.

“That can’t happen with a restaurant or two. We need the gas station,” Conkle said.

The recently damaged garage was built in 1910, according to Dietl, and was moved back when the road was widened in 1914. That was the year when the gas station with an island of gas pumps framed by arches was built.

It served as a pit stop for travelers on the Chicago to Los Angeles route and was later a hub of old Cucamonga. It was a gas station in the midst of vineyards.

The station closed in the mid-1970s and served as various small shops until the 1980s. At that point, the once bustling station became a victim of neglect, weather and vandalism. Those three factors were damaging.

“One alone is severe, but when you add all of that, the place deteriorated to where most people look at it as blight, but there’s so much potential,” Conkle said.

For the Route 66 Preservation Foundation, saving the former gas station is one of five priorities for the Mother Road.

“We’re not trying to bring back outhouses and un-air conditioned cars. We’re trying to bring back something that exists nowhere else on the road,” Conkle said. “Rancho Cucamonga is sitting on a gold mine, and they don’t realize it.”

For more information, visit www.route66sos.org

Oct 042010
 

We are selling ‘Pics on Route 66’ 2011 Calendar by David Schwartz.

These are full colored calendars filled with photos and information about the history, the people, and the places along Route 66.

We are selling these for $20 each and every dollar will be donated to the Sprague’s Super Service Station on Normal IL to help them with their restoration process.

The $20 price includes shipping within the continental United States.

Please help us support a fantastic cause and help keep another piece of history on Route 66 alive!

Get one for yourself and get a few more for gifts!!





If you place an order – please make sure you include your mailing address as well as your EMail address.

Thank you for your support!

Sep 212010
 

Sprague’s Super Service in Normal, IL is in the process of being restored. I met with Terri Ryburn and I told her I will do what I can to help this Historical Route 66 landmark reopen and have it be used by all travelers driving Route 66.

Terri Ryburn, a Route 66 author, bought the property in 2006. In 2007, Ryburn received a cost-share grant from the NPS to develop a Historic Structures Report to guide the building’s restoration and funds to replace the roof over the garage and make repairs to the ground floor restrooms. Additional money came from the Town of Normal, which funded the replacement of the building’s main roof; a separate grant from the State of Illinois paid for a new HVAC system. In 2008, Ryburn worked to get the property listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Illinois Route 66 Association has even pitched in with demolition and the installation of plumbing fixtures.

Ryburn has plans to turn the old Sprague’s Super Service into a visitor center, coffee shop, tea room and a public meeting space.

After Grant money ran out, she is hoping the Town of Normal will help with TIF money, but she told me that could be a year or two out (if it all).

She has been using every extra dime from her pay check to get the building open. She told me she has a long way to go – but was hoping to get at least the front area finished for visitors to finally stop by and see the building.

I told her – like I tell ever other business on the route – I will do what I can to help. This means everything from getting the word out – to raising funds – to grabbing a paintbrush – to hanging drywall!

How can you help?? Terri does not have a website for the station. She does not have a PayPal account – she told me travelers/visitors would read a sign on the window that says: “Please help us raise $$$ for the building” and they would slip $5 or $10 under the door. She would use that money for as many materials as she can.

Donations can be sent directly to Terri at:
Terri Ryburn
Sprague’s Super Service Station
305 E. Pine Street
Normal, IL 61761-1767

Please note: donations are NOT tax deductable. Also, let her know you find out about her fund raising from the Route 66 World website. This way we can see how efficient this campaign is.

Another way to send donations to Route 66 World via PayPal.
EVERY cent will be given to Terry to help her get the station open!
Click the button below and please put in your full name, and E-mail address so we can notify you when Terry receives the money.





Yet another way to help this cause is to share this article via FaceBook or Email. Go to our FaceBook page Click Here and ‘SHARE’ this with all of your friends and family members that supprot and travel Route 66!

Thank you so much for your support!!